Ms. Brown

Ann Brown

Founder

Saltability

With almost 20 years of experience in nearly every aspect of the resort spa business, Ann Brown is an industry veteran whose expertise extends from licensed cosmetologist, esthetician, nail technician and massage therapist to accomplished spa director and business manager. In 2014, she founded Saltability to answer the need for a better treatment in the spa industry and conceived a line of Himalayan salt products that benefit clients as well as their therapists. By keeping products and services chemical free and eco-friendly, Saltability offers multiple therapeutic benefits in a single treatment, helping client and practitioner alike. Today, Saltability is a spa industry partner that provides quality Himalayan salt stone treatments and products for resort, day, medical and destination spas.

Serving three years on the board of directors for the International Spa Association and five years on the education committee for the ISPA organization, Ms. Brown is trained in all facets of the spa industry and is a founding member of the American Spa Therapy Education and Certification Council, which educates some of the countryís top spas. She earned a bachelorís degree in business management from the University of Florida and contributed to the development of ISPAís Hiring and Training Guide, in addition to helping co-author two textbooks used for spa management degrees at major universities. Ms. Brown has presented on spa management and modalities at ISPAís annual conference, the American Massage Therapy Association conference, IECSC and more and has served her community as a board member of several nonprofits.

Please visit http://www.saltability.com for more information.

Ms. Brown can be contacted at 573-365-8498 or ann@saltability.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.