Dr. Vanderbroeck

Paul Vanderbroeck

Chartered FCIPD CC, Leadership Expert

PVDB Consulting; Faculty Member Glion Online

Dr. Paul Vanderbroeck develops leaders through executive coaching, workshops, and assessments. He works with teams and organizations to improve their collaboration and performance. Dr. Vanderbroeck has a particular interest in how leaders and organizations interact most effectively. In other words, he wants to help leaders get the results they want.

In his coaching practice Dr. Vanderbroeck specializes in Career Transitions, Intercultural Integration, making Female Executives successful, Performance Management, and Change. As a consultant and facilitator he is an expert in Effective Teamwork, Change Management, and Talent Management. Dr. Vanderbroeck believes in the importance of starting with a solid diagnosis, whether working with individuals, teams or organizations. Rather than a one-size-fits-all, he chooses from a portfolio of diagnostic instruments. Equally important are clear and ambitious objectives. Other than that, he is able to adapt his style to the needs of the situation and the individual he is working with. He thrives on the success of the people he accompanies.

Dr. Vanderbroeck’s clients are multinational organizations in all sectors, notably Financial Services, Pharmaceuticals, Professional Services, and FMCG. He is a career coach for the Global Leadership Fellows at the World Economic Forum and a Leadership Coach at IMD International. He teaches Leadership in the Executive Education programs of the HEC business schools in Geneva and Lausanne and is HRM faculty for Glion Institute of Higher Education MBA programs.

Dr. Vanderbroeck is one of the authors of Leading in the Top Team (Cambridge 2008), edited by IMD Professor Preston Bottger. He has published in Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, McKinsey Quarterly, Journal of Management Development, and International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching.

Dr. Vanderbroeck holds a BA, MA and PhD in History from the Catholic University of Nijmegen (NL) and is a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (UK). A certified Kenexa, MRG, SHL, PDI, MLQ, BCI, and Linkage International coach, he is qualified in numerous psychometric tests, assessment, selection and 360° feedback processes. He has been trained in consulting to groups at the Tavistock Institute. He keeps his skills up to date through monthly supervision.

Previously Dr. Vanderbroeck has held senior level positions in HR and Talent Management in Royal/Dutch Shell, General Motors, Georg Fisher and UBS. Paul’s working languages are English, French, German and Dutch. Apart from the Netherlands, he has worked and lived in the US, France, Germany and Switzerland.

Dr. Vanderbroeck can be contacted at paul.vanderbroeck@faculty.gliononline.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.