Mr. Pierotti

Dan Pierotti

Vice President Spa Development & Operations

Noble House Hotels & Resorts

Dan Pierotti, Vice President of Spa Development and Operations for Noble House Hotels and Resorts, joined the company in 1999. His extensive spa management experience has given Noble House the most unique and distinct world-class spas.

He began his spa career in 1991 as a massage therapist in the San Francisco Bay Area. There he had his own private practice, facilitated healing with chiropractors, sports teams, and various spas until 1994. Pierotti then embarked on an exciting spa career with cruise ships, after three months he was promoted to the Crystal Symphony to assist their inaugural world cruise. He continued with Crystal Cruises for two years, completing two world cruises and training other therapists in a variety of massage and body treatment modalities, while gathering global spa knowledge.

Mr. Pierotti returned to shore, landing in Las Vegas, Nevada to assist in the grand opening of the new spa at Caesars Palace. Here he assumed the positions of Assistant Manager, Director of Training and Lead Massage Therapist of The Spa at Caesars Palace.

Noble House selected Mr. Pierotti in 1999 to lead the development and operations of the new spa on Little Palm Island Resort. As spa director, he created his vision of an oasis within the property to provide guests with a feeling of intense tranquility and spiritual awareness and offer experiences highly distinctive and authentic in the spa industry, but very representative of the luxury service that makes up Noble House resorts. After the overwhelming success of the Island Spa on Little Palm Island Resort & Spa, Mr. Pierotti was promoted to his current position and continues to lead the SpaTerre development efforts for Noble House Hotels and Resorts. At the present time he has created fifteen world-class spas with Noble House. He is involved with every aspect -architectural design, functionality, equipment, interior design, experiences, staffing, product development, profitability - of the impact the spas will have on the overall well-being of the guests.

Mr. Pierotti is a graduate from the University of California at Santa Cruz with a degree in biology and also attended massage school in San Francisco to receive his certification and licensing in that field. He continues to explore, create and grow in the spa industry with a sincere, passionate and dedicated commitment to the vision of excellence and the well-being of others.

Mr. Pierotti can be contacted at 425-827-8737 or dpierotti@noblehousehotels.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, its that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.