Mr. Pierotti

Dan Pierotti

Vice President Spa Development & Operations

Noble House Hotels & Resorts

Dan Pierotti, Vice President of Spa Development and Operations for Noble House Hotels and Resorts, joined the company in 1999. His extensive spa management experience has given Noble House the most unique and distinct world-class spas.

He began his spa career in 1991 as a massage therapist in the San Francisco Bay Area. There he had his own private practice, facilitated healing with chiropractors, sports teams, and various spas until 1994. Pierotti then embarked on an exciting spa career with cruise ships, after three months he was promoted to the Crystal Symphony to assist their inaugural world cruise. He continued with Crystal Cruises for two years, completing two world cruises and training other therapists in a variety of massage and body treatment modalities, while gathering global spa knowledge.

Mr. Pierotti returned to shore, landing in Las Vegas, Nevada to assist in the grand opening of the new spa at Caesars Palace. Here he assumed the positions of Assistant Manager, Director of Training and Lead Massage Therapist of The Spa at Caesars Palace.

Noble House selected Mr. Pierotti in 1999 to lead the development and operations of the new spa on Little Palm Island Resort. As spa director, he created his vision of an oasis within the property to provide guests with a feeling of intense tranquility and spiritual awareness and offer experiences highly distinctive and authentic in the spa industry, but very representative of the luxury service that makes up Noble House resorts. After the overwhelming success of the Island Spa on Little Palm Island Resort & Spa, Mr. Pierotti was promoted to his current position and continues to lead the SpaTerre development efforts for Noble House Hotels and Resorts. At the present time he has created fifteen world-class spas with Noble House. He is involved with every aspect -architectural design, functionality, equipment, interior design, experiences, staffing, product development, profitability - of the impact the spas will have on the overall well-being of the guests.

Mr. Pierotti is a graduate from the University of California at Santa Cruz with a degree in biology and also attended massage school in San Francisco to receive his certification and licensing in that field. He continues to explore, create and grow in the spa industry with a sincere, passionate and dedicated commitment to the vision of excellence and the well-being of others.

Mr. Pierotti can be contacted at 425-827-8737 or dpierotti@noblehousehotels.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.