Mr. Morris

John Morris

Director of WELL Spa and Salon at Grand Geneva Resort & Spa

Grand Geneva Resort & Spa

Director of the WELL Spa + Salon at Grand Geneva Resort & Spa, John Morris, joined the team with more than 30 years of experience working and managing spas and fitness centers throughout the eastern United States. Mr. Morris entered the industry working at the Amelia Island Plantation in Florida as the Director of Spa and Fitness and Tennis Operations. There he managed facilities used by 1,800 club members and coordinated several parts of the WTA Bausch and Lomb professional tennis tournaments.

He also worked as the Director of Spa and Recreation at the top tier WaterColor Inn and Resort in Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, where he managed a staff of over 80 people and created and managed the ASBA's number one tennis center in America. Mr. Morris then moved to Essex, Vermont where he worked at the Essex Resort to design the spa, the membership plan and then coordinate the grand opening of The Spa at The Essex.

Most recently, Mr. Morris has worked as at several top tier locations including The Serenity by the Sea Spa in The Hilton Sandestin Beach in Florida, Hawks Cay Resort under WTS International in the Florida Keys, and The Avani Spa at the Abbey Resort in Fontana, Wisconsin.

In these locations, Mr. Morris has served as Director of Spa and Fitness where he has managed budgets of over $2.5 million, supervised and mentored staff, managed several successful redesigns and renovations, and landed several prestigious awards for the properties including Conde Nast and Trip Advisor accreditations.

A Massachusetts native, Mr. Morris attended Boston College where he received his degree in marketing and minored in finance.

Mr. Morris can be contacted at 800-558-3417 or info@grandgeneva.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.