Mr. Vanderslice

John T.A. Vanderslice

Global Head, Luxury and Lifestyle Brands

Hilton Worldwide

John T. A. Vanderslice serves as the Global Head of Luxury & Lifestyle Brands, of Hilton Worldwide, which includes Conrad Hotels & Resorts and Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts. Mr. Vanderslice joined Hilton Worldwide in September 2009 and has an extensive background in international hospitality and packaged goods. He has worked at such notable companies as Club Med, Inc. and Kraft General Foods.

Mr.Vanderslice served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Club Med Americas, operator of more than 100 leisure resorts in 30 countries, where he led Club Med's operations in North and South America. He was credited with successfully integrating Club Med's marketing and commercial activities, finance and operations while repositioning the all-inclusive resorts as upscale destinations.

Prior to joining Hilton Worldwide, Mr. Vanderslice served as Chief Executive Officer for Miraval Spa, Tucson, Ariz., where he where he was instrumental in transforming the 13-year old spa into a top-ranked lifestyle resort and launched the first branded lifestyle real estate concept, Miraval Living in New York.

Mr.Vanderslice has also held executive positions with Triarc Restaurant Group, Ft. Lauderdale and its subsidiaries including Arby's and T.J. Cinnamons, Inc. Prior to that, he served in a leadership capacity overseeing legacy brands and new product introductions for Kraft General Foods.

Mr. Vanderslice can be contacted at 703-883-1000 x35255 or john.vanderslice@hilton.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.