Ms. Schelske

Beth Schelske

Divisional Vice President – Client Services

Maritz Motivation Solutions

Beth Schelske is Divisional Vice President – Client Services for Maritz Motivation Solutions working with hospitality clients, including major international hotel chains, airlines and casinos. For over 25 years, Ms. Schelske has been working with Fortune 500 clients developing reward and recognition programs, sales incentives, and consumer loyalty solutions. Most recently she helped launch an international consumer rewards program for US based hospitality client with over 3,700,000 active members in more than 50 countries.

Prior to joining Maritz, Ms. Schelske was Vice President of Performance Solutions for ITAGroup. In this role, she helped design and manage employee recognition programs for clients in the telecommunications, manufacturing, automotive and pharmaceutical industries. She was a contributing inventor to the 2012 patent “System and Process for Integration of Incentive Award Programs with Existing Management Systems.” She is past president of the Forum for People Performance Management and former board member of the Incentive Marketing Association. She currently serves on the conference planning board for Recognition Professionals, International. She is a graduate of Grinnell College.

Maritz Motivation Solutions is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri and helps companies bring strategies to life by delivering tangible results, reducing costs, increasing productivity and driving growth. Maritz Motivation Solutions also works in collaboration with The Maritz Institute which is an independent network of thought leaders working to create next generation business practices based on human science research.

Ms. Schelske can be contacted at beth.schelske@maritz.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.