Mr. Galusha

Shannon Galusha

Culinary Director

Columbia Hospitality

Shannon Galusha, Culinary Director of Columbia Hospitality leads the way in directing and mentoring the culinary teams at Columbia's award-winning boutique hotels, conference centers and distinctive venues. From the iconic Salish Lodge & Spa in Snoqualmie, Washington to the Rainbow Ranch Lodge on the Gallatin River in Big Sky, Montana, and the Kenwood Inn and Spa in Kenwood, California, Mr. Galusha incorporates his invaluable 14 years of expertise into the unique branding of each property.

Mr. Galusha's impressive background includes work with The French Laundry in California's Napa Valley, Rue Balzac in Paris, as well as Campagne in Seattle. He delighted the Seattle culinary community with his work as chef/owner at Veil in Seattle's Queen Anne neighborhood. Mr. Galusha formerly managed the direction of the highly acclaimed Bastille Restaurant in Ballard, as well as its Mexican offspring, Poquitos on Capitol Hill. Most recently, Mr. Galusha was the culinary director of Classic Concept Group, where he launched unique dining concepts including Cal's Classic American Kitchen in Seattle's booming South Lake Union neighborhood.

Born and raised in the Seattle area, Mr. Galusha currently resides in Snoqualmie, Washington with his wife and two children. Whenever not in the kitchen, Mr. Galusha can be found exploring the Northwest and spending time with his family.

Mr. Galusha can be contacted at 206-239-1800 or info@columbiahospitality.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.