Ms. Setzermann

Kimberly Setzermann

Co-Founder

Pure Strategic Solutions

Kimberly Setzermann is the co-founder of Pure Strategic Solutions, a fresh and young hospitality consulting company with a focus on creating profit driven innovations in Spa and F&B concept development. By utilizing her education in global wellness practices, each project strives to integrate a local culture’s authentic indigenous beliefs in medicine into more common and universally accepted products and therapies.

Ms. Setzermann is currently based in Africa, devising the expansion of rooms and the implementation of spa facilities for an upscale safari lodge in Arusha, Tanzania, while simultaneously streamlining lodge operations by holding the position as General Manager.

Ms. Setzermann holds a Master Degree in Hospitality from Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne (EHL), as well as certifications in Neuromuscular Massage Therapy (Colorado Institute of Massage Therapy), Yoga Instruction (Yoga Center of Minneapolis), and Nutritional Health Counseling (Institute for Integrative Nutrition).

Ms. Setzermann's passion to study the current usage of traditional medicines have taken her to live in Japan, India, Taiwan, Turkey, Costa Rica, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Kimberly has worked in a private practice as a Wellness Consultant in New York City, devising six-month total health programs for clients with measurable results.

Ms. Setzermann has contributed as a writer and speaker for the Global Spa Summit in Istanbul, Turkey and is currently the on the board of directors for the Hotel Association Tanzania (HAT). Her enthusiasm has led her to enjoy experiences working within education at EHL as a guest speaker and coach for students that share a similar passion for the spa industry.

Ms. Setzermann can be contacted at 255-0-78-386-9027 or kimberly@missionpure.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.