Ms. Setzermann

Kimberly Setzermann

Co-Founder

Pure Strategic Solutions

Kimberly Setzermann is the co-founder of Pure Strategic Solutions, a fresh and young hospitality consulting company with a focus on creating profit driven innovations in Spa and F&B concept development. By utilizing her education in global wellness practices, each project strives to integrate a local culture’s authentic indigenous beliefs in medicine into more common and universally accepted products and therapies.

Ms. Setzermann is currently based in Africa, devising the expansion of rooms and the implementation of spa facilities for an upscale safari lodge in Arusha, Tanzania, while simultaneously streamlining lodge operations by holding the position as General Manager.

Ms. Setzermann holds a Master Degree in Hospitality from Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne (EHL), as well as certifications in Neuromuscular Massage Therapy (Colorado Institute of Massage Therapy), Yoga Instruction (Yoga Center of Minneapolis), and Nutritional Health Counseling (Institute for Integrative Nutrition).

Ms. Setzermann's passion to study the current usage of traditional medicines have taken her to live in Japan, India, Taiwan, Turkey, Costa Rica, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Kimberly has worked in a private practice as a Wellness Consultant in New York City, devising six-month total health programs for clients with measurable results.

Ms. Setzermann has contributed as a writer and speaker for the Global Spa Summit in Istanbul, Turkey and is currently the on the board of directors for the Hotel Association Tanzania (HAT). Her enthusiasm has led her to enjoy experiences working within education at EHL as a guest speaker and coach for students that share a similar passion for the spa industry.

Ms. Setzermann can be contacted at 255-0-78-386-9027 or kimberly@missionpure.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.