Mr. Osiecki

Timothy E. Osiecki

President of Design & Construction

Concord Hospitality Enterprises

Timothy Osiecki and Concord CEO Mark Laport were custom home builders before Concord Hospitality was founded in 1985 with a vision of developing and managing high quality hotels to become industry leaders.

Mr. Osiecki led the design team responsible for the first LEED-certified Courtyard by Marriott prototype hotel, and received Marriott’s first Icon Award for smartly creating new innovative ways to enhance brand design without additional cost. In 2012, he reprised his role as brand innovator by leading the design of the Gen IV SpringHill Suites prototype in Latrobe PA and received a "Design Excellence" award for his efforts.

“LEED gave us another avenue to sustain our goal of being industry leaders by providing owners with a compelling ROI while providing an enhanced guest experience,” Mr. Osiecki says.

Since Concord’s founding, Mr. Osiecki has directed the development and construction of 10,000 hotel rooms and overseen the conversion of many existing hotels to new flags. Since committing in 2009 to develop only LEED-certified hotels, his team has opened four new LEED properties, (493 rooms) and has another seven under construction and nine more in design phase.

Mr. Osiecki is a longstanding member of the Design and Construction Committees for Marriott’s SpringHill Suites, Courtyard, and Fairfield Inn & Suites brands as well as Starwood’s Aloft and Element brands. He is currently working with Hyatt to develop enhanced cost effective design alternatives.

Mr. Osiecki can be contacted at 919-455-2900 or tim.osiecki@concordhotels.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.