Dr. Hawkins

Rebecca Hawkins

Managing Director

Responsible Hospitality Partnership

Rebecca Hawkins is the Managing Director of RHP Ltd, a Research Fellow of Oxford Brookes University and Visiting Professor to the International Centre for Responsible Tourism at Leeds Metropolitan University.

A resource management specialist, with training in ISO 14001 implementation, Dr. Hawkins has managed a number of projects that combine the need to deliver sustainability initiatives alongside cost savings.

Dr. Hawkins regularly provides training within hotel businesses and offers strategic consultancy to help senior executives in the sector design effective responsible business programs. Through RHP, she provides consulting services to a wide range of clients from across the hospitality and food service sectors.

Her experience in the sector means that she has been asked to write or contribute to much of the guidance that is available to the sector on resource efficiency. She also regularly writes for the trade press.

She has recently made input into UK energy and waste initiatives and has played a role in a major waste prevention initiative for the sector. She also works with many of the NGOs in the sector, for example, delivering some of the initial research about the credibility of different sustainable tourism certification initiatives and leading research into customer expectations of responsible business programs.

Dr, Hawkins has recently published two books on responsible hospitality. One of these is recognized as “the complete handbook for corporate responsibility in the hospitality industry” and the other includes letters from 46 industry leaders about the importance of Green Growth.

Dr. Hawkins can be contacted at 44-1993-868392 or rebecca@rhpltd.net

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.