Mr. Zinder, AIA

Joshua Zinder, AIA

Principal

JZA+D

Joshua Zinder, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C, founder and principal of JZA+D, was born and raised in New York. He received a Bachelor of Architecture from Syracuse University and a Masters of Advanced Architectural Design from Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. His 20-plus years of professional experience working for many design firms includes six years as an Associate with Michael Graves & Associates.

Mr. Zinder has worked on a diverse range of projects, such as: The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, Wyndham Hotel Prototypes, The Bedford Central School District, Irvington Union Free Schools, MTI Television Studios, and many others.

In 2006, he opened his own practice to pursue contemporary and sustainably responsible design. Since then, he has designed projects worldwide, such as Waku Ghin, Sky on 57, Restaurant Charlie, and Hamilton Square South.

Mr. Zinder is a registered architect in the states of New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Nevada. He is NCARB certified and a LEED accredited professional. Joshua has also served as adjunct Professor at the New Jersey School of Architecture, where he taught comprehensive design studios.

As an active member of his community, Mr. Zinder has been a board member for a number of not-for-profit organizations, including Solomon Schechter Day School of Raritan Valley, The Jewish Center of Princeton, Electronic Music Foundation, and Sustainable Princeton. In 2011, he won the Gotham City Networking "Networker of the Year" Award. In 2013, he was named AIA-NJ Architect of the Year. Mr. Zinder is passionate about architecture and design from every angle, and brings his vision of complete environments and a unique contemporary style to every project.

Mr. Zinder, AIA can be contacted at 609-924-5004 or jzinder@joshuazinder.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.