Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Miranda Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management

Florida International University

Dr. Miranda Kitterlin is an Assistant Professor in the Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Florida International University, where she teaches graduate level Hospitality Management courses. She received her doctoral degree in May of 2010 in Hospitality Administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She holds a Masterís degree in Human Resources and a Bachelorís degree in Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management from the University of Louisiana, Lafayette.

Prior to beginning a career in academia, Dr. Kitterlin worked for 11 years in the lodging and food and beverage industries in Louisiana, Michigan, and Las Vegas. What began on a whim as an entry-level front-of-house position quickly developed into operational management, sales, and human resources management roles, and a lifelong passion for Hospitality Management.

During her industry career, Dr. Kitterlin encountered a number of employee issues that led her to seek answers in academic research. Each scholarly investigative venture fueled the desire to begin another, resulting in her decision to pursue a terminal degree and a future in academia.

Her first educational venture was as an instructor as St. Landry Accelerated Transition School, where she designed a Hospitality and Tourism curriculum and skills certification program for the vocational educational program.

During her university level academic career, Dr. Kitterlin has taught both traditional and online Hospitality Management classes at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, James Madison University, and now Florida International University, where she teaches Masterís degree classes in Hospitality Industry Organizational Behavior, and Case Studies in Hospitality Management.

Dr. Kitterlinís research focuses primarily on Food and Beverage, Human Resources, and Organizational Behavior issues. She has published on topics of foodservice industry employee selection and screening, employee behavior and perceptions, training needs of hospitality employees, food-safety education, and hospitality student learning styles. Much of her work centers on employee substance abuse and employment drug-testing in the hospitality industry.

Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D. can be contacted at 305-919-4424 or miranda.kitterlin@fiu.edu

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, itís that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort Ė one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms Ė they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.