Mr. Parker

Jeffrey Stephen Parker

Vice President of Technology

Stout Street Hospitality/Magnolia Hotels

Currently the Vice President of Technology and Chief Funologist for Denver-based Stout Street Hospitality, Jeffrey Parkerís responsibilities include all communications and technology projects for the management company and its core brand, Magnolia Hotels, including System and data security, and infrastructure design and operations support for over 500 employees.

Some of his recent high-profile projects include the deployment of VMware, Libra on Demand, HotSOS, Airwatch, and Google Apps for Business. Parker is a nationally recognized leader in data security; notably with relation to PCI compliance.

He holds a bachelorís degree in Technical Communications from Metropolitan State College of Denver and has been working in the industry for over 25 years. As VP for Stout Street, Mr. Parker has championed the commitment of the company to invest in technology that lowers the cost of compliance while maintaining high-security and accessibility. As Chief Funologist for the company, Mr. Parker is also responsible for the company executives morale and teamwork initiatives.

Denver-based Stout Street Hospitality, a privately held hotel management and development company operates upscale boutique hotels catering to the sophisticated traveler. The company focuses on development, management, acquisition, re-branding, new construction and conversation of existing hotel properties. The core product line consists of award-winning, independent boutique hotels under the Magnolia brand that offer a style unlike that of trendy or branded hotels. The company currently operates hotels in Denver, Colo.; Dallas, Houston, and Bryan, Texas; and Omaha, Neb., and is exploring other markets for additional growth opportunities.

Mr. Parker can be contacted at 303-351-1649 or jparker@stoutstreethospitality.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.