Ms. Mongeon

Chanel Mongeon

Assistant Chief Concierge

Marriott Chateau Champlain

Since a very young age Chanel Mongeon knew that her calling was to work amongst the public. Communicating with people had always been easy and very pleasurable for her. Fed by an insatiable curiosity in life, with time she decided to combine her passion for traveling with her desire to help people.

Ms. Mongeon graduated in 2003 from the Institut de Tourisme et d`Hotellerie du Québec (ITHQ) in Montréal. After having worked a couple of summers as a tour guide on the Amphibian-Bus Tour in Old Montreal, the experience allowed her to see the city in a different way, allowing her to refine her public speaking skills and lastly, it gave her a taste of what it was to constantly work with tourists.

With curiosity & ambition came more responsibilities. Ms. Mongeon started expanding my her responsibilities, getting more involved in the marketing of the company. This allowed her to establish some important contacts in the tourism industry and was instrumental in her progression to the concierge profession.

In 2004 Ms. Mongeon officially made her career move into the hotel industry, working at the Marriott Chateau Champlain for the past 8 years occupying the role of the Assistant Chef Concierge for 6 years and the role of Chef Concierge (per interim) for a year and a half. With her full time duties as Chef Concierge, she is also very involved in the local community, volunteering her time to 'Les Clefs d`Or Canada'- the association known worldwide as the symbol of outstanding and professional service. Ms. Mongeon has been a Clefs d’Or member since 2007.

Ms. Mongeon can be contacted at 514-878-9000 x221 or serviceconcierge@chateauchamplain.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.