Mr. Hacker

Steven Hacker

Principal

Bravo Management

Following a distinguished 40 year long career as CEO of several non profit associations, Steven Hacker, CAE, CEM, FASAE is the Principal of Bravo Management providing strategic, leadership and event planning expertise to associations and trade show organizers around the world. He also authors a monthly column (The Association Doctor) in Association News, a magazine produced by Schneider Publishing of Los Angeles.

Mr. Hacker is recognized as an authority on the leadership of non profit organizations and has earned both the prestigious Certified Association Executive designation (1974) and was named a Fellow of the American Society of Association Executives (1988).

During more than two decades as CEO of the International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE), headquartered in Dallas, Mr. Hacker helped build that organizations membership four-fold and established offices in Brussels, Singapore and Beijing. He designed the Certified in Exhibition Management (CEM) designation program that now operates in nine nations. He earned the CEM designation in 2012.

Inducted into the Convention Industry Council’s Hall of Leaders in 2007, Mr. Hacker has also been named “One of the 25 Most Influential People in the Events Industry” nine times and has been recognized by many organizations for his contributions to the industry.

Mr. Hacker is also an award winning professional photographer and provides event photography services to a growing list of clientele.

Mr. Hacker can be contacted at 214-597-9791 or stevenhacker@me.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.