Mr. Robertson

Mark Robertson

Partner

Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP

Mark Robertson has more than 20 years of experience practicing law in the hospitality industry. Prior to joining Sutherland, he spent 17 years with Hilton Worldwide, Inc., ultimately as senior vice president and assistant general counsel responsible for the companyís operations, brand and commercial services teams. He managed the full array of business and legal issues relating to international and domestic operations and services for more than 3,500 owned, leased, licensed, franchised and affiliated properties across 10 different hotel brands.

Mr. Robertson has extensive experience in information technology, information services, intellectual property, eCommerce, procurement and outsourcing law, having been involved in negotiating, structuring, drafting, implementing and overseeing all manner of purchase and outsourcing agreements.

His diverse experience includes oversight of marketing, branding and public relations; crisis management; compliance; joint ventures; new ventures; antitrust and competition; internet distribution; sales; mergers and acquisitions; and franchising and development.

Earlier in his career, Mr. Robertson practiced real estate and environmental law at a firm in Los Angeles, California. Prior to law school, he served as a foreign service officer in the U.S. Department of State. His work there took him to diplomatic assignments around the world, including Italy, Canada, Lebanon and the Yemen Arab Republic.

Mr. Robertson is admitted to The State Bar of California. He has submitted his application to the District of Columbia Bar. His work is supervised by District of Columbia bar members.

Mr. Robertson can be contacted at 202-383-0945 or mark.robertson@sutherland.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.