Mr. Brand

John Brand

Executive Chef

Hotel Pearl – Kimpton Hotels

Chef John Brand grew up in the Midwest spending most of his time on a farm in the Nebraska. He began his career washing dishes as a teenager in Green Bay Wisconsin and progressed to stay in the kitchen for the past 25+ years.

Mr. Brand has cooked his way around the country for fine dining restaurants and resorts, most notably in Beaver Creek Colorado, Scottsdale Arizona, The Little Nell in Aspen Colorado, Keswick Hall in Charlottesville Virginia, and the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs Colorado.

In 2008, he arrived in San Antonio Texas as Executive Chef La Mansion del Rio and Mokara Hotel and Spa. In 2011, he was also asked to be the Area Executive Chef for Omni Hotels and Resorts.

As of May 2014, Mr. Brand is an Executive Chef for Kimpton Hotels which will be opening a new hotel at the Pearl Brewery in San Antonio later this year.

Mr. Brand can be contacted at 210-518-1016 or john.brand@hotelpearl.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.