Mr. Murphy

Wade Murphy

Executive Chef

The Lodge at Doonbeg

Wade Murphy is Executive Chef at The Lodge at Doonbeg in County Clare, Ireland. A self-proclaimed “modern Irish chef” who dazzles with creative twists on the traditional cuisine of his homeland, Murphy brings native sensibility and two decades of regional and international experience to County Clare. He is responsible for all culinary operations at the 5-star hotel and golf resort, including menu creation at The Long Room, Darby’s Bar, the Tea Room and the Member’s Bar, as well for in-suite dining and catering.

With Chef Murphy’s fresh, native influence on the menu, guests of The Lodge at Doonbeg savor a true taste of Ireland with distinctively personal and contemporary twists. A native of coastal Wexford who has traveled and worked professionally all over the world, Chef Murphy was drawn into the culinary field by his grandmother, a prominent local cook who served as a mentor throughout his youth.

Utilizing fresh, locally sourced ingredients, Chef Murphy takes the traditional elements of the Irish diet over the top. “I put a lot of gra into my food,” he says, which is Gaelic for “love” to express the passion with which he approaches his dishes. Salmon and cod from County Clare; Burren beef and lamb from nearby Montgomery Farms; local Irish cheeses; and seasonal herbs, heirloom tomatoes and organic lettuce grown in greenhouses at The Lodge at Doonbeg crowd Murphy’s kitchen, suffusing menus with an authenticity that appeals to refined gourmets and adventurous foodies. Guests can also expect superb fish-and-chips—everybody’s favorite, and Chef Murphy’s, too—throughout the week.

With a flair for food preparation and attentive service, Chef Murphy’s history at award-winning restaurants primed him for working with Consulting Chef Tom Colicchio at The Lodge at Doonbeg. Chef Murphy’s talents have not gone unnoticed: He was named “Best Chef in Connaught” in the 2009 Food & Wine Magazine Irish Restaurant Awards and among the Top 20 Irish Chefs rated by Food & Wine Magazine in 2010.

Chef Murphy joined The Lodge at Doonbeg following a noteworthy run at the critically acclaimed Salt Restaurant at Lisloughrey Lodge in Cong, Ireland. From 2005-2007, he was Restaurant Chef and Banqueting Chef at Four Seasons Hotel Chicago and, before that, Sous Chef at Four Seasons Hotel Dublin. He also oversaw the openings of Four Seasons hotels in Sharm El Sheik, Egypt and London.

Chef Murphy trained at D.I.T Cathal Brugha Street while apprenticing in Gorey and Dublin, and later relocated to London where he worked in hotels and restaurants. An avid golfer who feels fortunate to be stationed near the Greg Norman-designed championship links that anchor The Lodge at Doonbeg, he resides in County Clare.

Mr. Murphy can be contacted at 353 65 9055600 or info@doonbeglodge.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.