Ms. Brock

Colby Brock

F&B Director and Interior Designer/Project Manager

The Radisson Hotel New Rochelle

Colby Brock obtained a Bachelor of Arts Degree with a double major in Psychology and English from the University of Hartford. She interned for the Radisson Hotel New Rochelle while attending college and began working there full-time in 1999 as restaurant manager. In 2008, while continuing to manage the City Lounge at the Radisson, Ms. Brock pursued a degree in Interior Design form Parsons School of Design in Manhattan. She then joined as a designer for Mojo Stumer Associates, an architectural design firm. One of the projects she worked on was the re-design of the Radisson’s lobby.

In 2011, Ms. Brock returned to the Radisson as the Food and Beverage Director, Interior Designer/Project Manager, with responsibility for overseeing the $2 million renovation program to re-position the hotel as a stylish, contemporary, Manhattan boutique hotel. The scope of the project included upgrades of all 129 guest rooms, the lobby, elevators, hospitality suites and the re-branding of its restaurant which opened on May 15, 2012 as NoMa Social. Everything about the new dining destination reflects Ms. Brock’s design sensibility and understanding of the vital role that F&B plays in enhancing the hotel experience of today’s sophisticated traveler.

To help make NoMa Social feel like a second home for visitors, a ‘library décor’ was created, one that is eclectic, with warm purple and gray colors, yet chic at the same time. The space includes numerous comfortable couches and low cocktail tables that can accommodate a variety of group sizes, as well as more traditional seating. The Mediterranean menu, created by acclaimed executive chef Bill Rosenberg, offers tapas and other small plates that can be shared in surroundings that promote a relaxing and interactive dining experience.

Ms. Brock’s contributions to the Radisson Hotel New Rochelle’s improvements were instrumental in the hotel winning a “Renovation Excellence Award” from the Radisson’s parent company, Carlson, one of the world’s largest hospitality and travel groups.

Ms. Brock is also responsible for the hotel’s floor management, staff training, corporate and social function contracts, menu and promotional creations as well as the hotel’s public relations, marketing, promotion and advertising program.

For the past 16 years, she has been a strong supporter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Westchester/Hudson Valley Chapter where she is currently serving as a member of the Board of Trustees. She is married to Mario Gualano.

Ms. Brock can be contacted at 914-576-3700 or colby.brock@radisson.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.