Ms. Snyder

Mari Snyder

VP Social Responsibility & Community Engagement

Marriott International, Inc.

Mari Snyder is responsible for developing Marriott’s social responsibility strategy and its global implementation and, in her role on the company’s Global Green Council, collaborates enterprise-wide to develop Marriott’s sustainability strategy and practices, in support of the Council’s executive co-chairs.

Ms. Snyder manages Marriott’s portfolio of innovative environmental initiatives, including a rainforest preservation project in the Amazon and a water conservation/micro-enterprise project in Southwest China. Ms. Snyder’s team establishes and manages the company’s community partnerships, corporate contributions, disaster relief, associate volunteerism and stakeholder engagement programs. She reports the company’s sustainability and social responsibility results.

Ms. Snyder joined Marriott in 1999. Marriott International, Inc. is a leading lodging company with nearly 3,700 lodging properties in 72 countries and territories. Marriott employs approximately 129,000 employees and is recognized by FORTUNE® as one of the best companies to work for and one of the world's most admired companies.

Prior to joining Marriott, Ms. Snyder worked for M&M/MARS for nine years. In addition to serving on the Board of Directors of Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, Ms. Snyder serves on the Board of Advisors of the Universities at Shady Grove, University System of Maryland and the Business Advisory Council of St. Bonaventure University.

Ms. Snyder can be contacted at 301-380-2702 or mari.snyder@marriott.com

Coming Up In The July Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Spa: Measuring the Results
As the Hotel Spa and Wellness Movement continues to flourish, spa operations are seeking new and innovative ways to expand their menu of services to attract even more people to their facilities, and to and measure the results of spa treatments. Whether it’s spa, fitness, wellness meet guest expectations. Among new developments, there seems to be a growing emphasis on science to define or beauty services, guests are becoming increasingly careful about what they ingest, inhale or put on their skin, and they are requesting scientific data on the treatments they receive. They are open to exploring the benefits of alternative therapies – like brain fitness exercises, electro-magnetic treatments, and chromotherapy – but only if they have been validated scientifically. Similarly, some spas are integrating select medical services and procedures into their operations, continuing the convergence of hotel spas with the medical world. Parents are also increasingly concerned about the health and well-being of their children and are willing to devote time and money to overcome their poor diets, constant stress, and hours spent hunched over computer, tablet and smartphone screens. Parents are investing in wellness-centric family vacations; yoga and massage for kids; mindfulness and meditation classes; and healthy, locally sourced, organic food. For hotel spas, this trend represents a significant area for future growth. Other trends include the proliferation of Wellness Festivals which celebrate health and well-being, and position hotel spas front and center. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.