Ms. Baylor

Julie Baylor

CHA, LEED Green Associate

Julie Baylor Hospitality Consulting

For more than two decades, Julie Baylor has worked in various roles within the hospitality industry, encompassing nearly all areas of hotel operations: Guest Services, Sales and Marketing, Banquets and Catering, Revenue Management, Accounting, Safety and Security, Capital Planning and Execution, Rooms Management, Training and Human Resources.

A California native, Ms. Baylor has always held a special place in her heart for the California coast, recognizing its strength and beauty, as well as its vulnerability. This love of nature combined with her industry expertise has cultivated a desire to help preserve natural habitats that sustain travel and tourism by lessening the environmental impacts of the hotel industry. Her expertise, and passion, is for the hotel industry, and therefore she has made it her career and personal mission to help hotels do their part to save the world from climate change.

In 2010, Ms. Baylor co-created and spearheaded the “Gateway to a Greener LA” initiative for the Gateway to L.A. business district. The initiative was the collaborative effort of partners Radisson Los Angeles Airport Hotel, West Los Angeles College, and the Gateway to LA business district, to provide guidance and mentorship to businesses within the district with the goal of achieving measurable green outcomes. The year-long project resulted in the certification of 4 hotels, or a total of 2,735 guestrooms, representing over 38% of the room inventory within the district.

Ms. Baylor holds a Hospitality Operations degree from Monterey Peninsula College, a Hospitality Management diploma from the AHLA Educational Institute, and Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA) designation. She is also a credentialed LEED Green Associate.

Ms. Baylor can be contacted at 323-540-4449 or julie@juliebaylor.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.