Mr. Goff

Colby Goff

Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development

Boingo Wireless

As Boingo’s Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development, Goff Colby is responsible for securing new venues for deploying public space Wi-Fi including airports, stadiums, arenas, shopping centers and restaurants. He is also instrumental in structuring software license agreements for telecommunications companies and developing strategic partnerships with handheld device manufacturers.

With more than 10 years of experience in the public Wi-Fi industry, Mr. Colby is responsible for strategic initiatives and partnerships with manufacturers of access control devices, WLAN gear, chipsets and switching solution providers targeting Wi-Fi enabled handheld consumer electronics devices.

Prior to joining Boingo, Mr. Colby was a member of the business development team for eCompanies and charged with sourcing new investments and managing existing portfolio companies. Colby received his BA in economics from Stanford University.

Boingo Wireless, Inc. (NASDAQ: WIFI), the world’s leading Wi-Fi software and services provider, makes it easy, convenient and cost-effective for people to enjoy Wi-Fi access on their laptop or mobile device at more than 400,000 hotspots worldwide. With a single account, Boingo users can access the mobile Internet via Boingo Network locations that include the top airports around the world, major hotel chains, cafés and coffee shops, restaurants, convention centers and metropolitan hot zones. Boingo and its Concourse Communications Group subsidiary operate wired and wireless networks at large-scale venues worldwide such as airports, major sporting arenas, shopping malls, and convention centers, as well as quick serve restaurants.

Mr. Goff can be contacted at 310-586-4009 or cgoff@boingo.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.