Mr. Goff

Colby Goff

Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development

Boingo Wireless

As Boingo’s Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development, Goff Colby is responsible for securing new venues for deploying public space Wi-Fi including airports, stadiums, arenas, shopping centers and restaurants. He is also instrumental in structuring software license agreements for telecommunications companies and developing strategic partnerships with handheld device manufacturers.

With more than 10 years of experience in the public Wi-Fi industry, Mr. Colby is responsible for strategic initiatives and partnerships with manufacturers of access control devices, WLAN gear, chipsets and switching solution providers targeting Wi-Fi enabled handheld consumer electronics devices.

Prior to joining Boingo, Mr. Colby was a member of the business development team for eCompanies and charged with sourcing new investments and managing existing portfolio companies. Colby received his BA in economics from Stanford University.

Boingo Wireless, Inc. (NASDAQ: WIFI), the world’s leading Wi-Fi software and services provider, makes it easy, convenient and cost-effective for people to enjoy Wi-Fi access on their laptop or mobile device at more than 400,000 hotspots worldwide. With a single account, Boingo users can access the mobile Internet via Boingo Network locations that include the top airports around the world, major hotel chains, cafés and coffee shops, restaurants, convention centers and metropolitan hot zones. Boingo and its Concourse Communications Group subsidiary operate wired and wireless networks at large-scale venues worldwide such as airports, major sporting arenas, shopping malls, and convention centers, as well as quick serve restaurants.

Mr. Goff can be contacted at 310-586-4009 or cgoff@boingo.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.