Ms. Stiel

Holly Stiel

President

Thank You Very Much Inc.

Holly Stiel, President of Thank You Very Much Inc is a trailblazing service philosopher who innovated a method of training based on the practices and principles of the world-class concierge. Her clients include: Disney, Nordstrom, AVEDA, American Express, Visa Signature card and Auberge Resorts, to name a few. Through the partnership with her team at StielMedia, Ms. Stiel has developed the corporate service training programs for four brands of the Hilton Family of Hotels, Hyatt Place Hotels, Auberge Resorts and Premiere Resorts, as well as three award-winning interactive DVD programs.

In 1976, Ms. Stiel became the first female concierge in the country when she created the desk at the Grand Hyatt Union Square in San Francisco.

Two years later she was the first American woman to be admitted to the exclusive Les Clefs d'Or Association for concierges. She recently received the association's Lifetime Achievement award for her broad contributions to her profession. Ms. Stiel was the first female and non-corporate executive to receive the "Distinguished Visiting Professor" Chair from Johnson and Wales University.

Ms. Stiel has written four books : the newly released textbook, The Art and Science of the Hotel Concierge. Ultimate Service, The Complete Handbook to the World of the Concierge, Thank You Very Much – A Book for Anyone Who Has Ever Said, “May I Help you?,” and The Neon Signs of Service.

Ms. Stiel can be contacted at 415-383-4220 or Thankyouinc@aol.com

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key
The challenge for hotel food and beverage operations is to serve the personal tastes and needs of an increasingly diverse population and, at the same time, to keep up with ever-evolving industry trends. In order to accomplish this, restaurateurs and hoteliers have to flex their creative muscles and pull out all the stops to satisfy their various audiences. One way to achieve this is to utilize existing food spaces in multiple ways at different times of the day. Lunch can be casual and fast, while dinnertime can be more formal and slower paced. The same restaurant can offer counter service by day but provide table service by night, with a completely different menu and atmosphere. Changes in music, lighting, uniforms and tabletop design contribute to its transformation. This multi- purpose approach seeks to meet the dining needs of guests as they change throughout the day. Today’s restaurants also have to go to great lengths to fulfill all the diverse dietary preferences of their guests. The popularity of plant-based, paleo, vegan, and gluten and allergen-free diets means that traditional menus must evolve from protein-heavy, carb-loaded offerings to those featuring more vegetables and legumes. Chefs are doing creative things with vegetables, such as experimenting with global cuisines or incorporating new vegetable hybrids into their dishes. Another trend is an emphasis on bold and creative flavors. From chili oil to sriracha to spicy maple syrup, entrees, desserts and beverages are all being enhanced with spice and heat. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.