Mr. Hogan

David Hogan

Executive Director of Major Accounts

Heartland Payment Systems

As the Executive Director of Major Accounts at Heartland Payment Systems, David Hogan leads the company’s major accounts sales team that is focused on driving significant business growth among mid-to-large level businesses in the retail and hospitality industries.

Prior to joining Heartland, Mr. Hogan served as chief information officer and senior vice president of retail operations for the National Retail Federation (NRF), the world’s largest retail association. Responsible for the association’s IT, supply chain, e-commerce and loss prevention departments, he directed numerous internal and retail industry IT initiatives and managed NRF's CIO Council, a committee of retailing’s most prominent chief information officers. He also led a coalition of retailers to improve weaknesses in Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI DSS) and testified to Congress on cybersecurity and securing the payments system.

During his tenure at the NRF, Mr. Hogan was named to Executive Technology Magazine’s list of the “Top 50 Most Influential People in Retail.”

Before his role at the NRF, Mr. Hogan served as chief information officer and vice president for international retailer Duty Free Americas. In this capacity, Hogan was responsible for all corporate information systems and merchandise planning. He also held a senior level position with The Limited, Inc., serving as business unit chief information officer for its Lane Bryant division, overseeing the information systems activities for 775 stores. Mr. Hogan began his career at the specialty footwear retailer, The Kobacker Company, where he rose through the ranks to become vice president of information systems.

Mr. Hogan has a bachelor’s degree in computer science from The Ohio State University and earned his MBA from the University of Dayton

Mr. Hogan can be contacted at 972-295-8677 or david.hogan@e-hps.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.