Mr. Rahe

Eric Rahe

Principal

BLT Architects

Eric M. Rahe is a principal and member of the executive leadership team at BLT Architects. Eric’s thirty years of practice span the hospitality, residential, retail, commercial office, and educational sectors with a special focus on large-scale hospitality and resort projects.

Mr. Rahe has led projects at more than 17 hotels, ranging from limited service hotels to large-scale, multi-billion dollar resorts. Notable projects include The Marriott Center City Philadelphia, Lowes Philadelphia, Echelon Resort in Las Vegas, The Water Club and Borgata in Atlantic City, and Revel Resort in Atlantic City. Revel is a 6.3 million square foot beachfront destination in Atlantic City, New Jersey featuring 1,898 guest rooms, numerous culinary and lifestyle experiences and 150,000 square feet of gaming space.

Having developed a strong interest in how the design process influences the success of each project and a passion for clarity in design and communication, Mr. Rahe has built a reputation for his analytical approach to understanding his clients’ needs and managing large and diverse teams. Influenced by a history of extensive collaboration between the design and construction teams in his work, he is guiding the firm’s process and technology initiatives in support of industry trends towards integrated project delivery.

Mr. Rahe is also an avid proponent for the sustainability of environmental, capital, and human resources, an outlook shaped by his undergraduate studies in environmental design and reinforced during recent certification as a LEED AP.

He earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design/Architecture from Miami University.

Mr. Rahe can be contacted at 215-563-3900 or hmt@blta.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.