Mr. Rahe

Eric Rahe

Principal

BLT Architects

Eric M. Rahe is a principal and member of the executive leadership team at BLT Architects. Eric’s thirty years of practice span the hospitality, residential, retail, commercial office, and educational sectors with a special focus on large-scale hospitality and resort projects.

Mr. Rahe has led projects at more than 17 hotels, ranging from limited service hotels to large-scale, multi-billion dollar resorts. Notable projects include The Marriott Center City Philadelphia, Lowes Philadelphia, Echelon Resort in Las Vegas, The Water Club and Borgata in Atlantic City, and Revel Resort in Atlantic City. Revel is a 6.3 million square foot beachfront destination in Atlantic City, New Jersey featuring 1,898 guest rooms, numerous culinary and lifestyle experiences and 150,000 square feet of gaming space.

Having developed a strong interest in how the design process influences the success of each project and a passion for clarity in design and communication, Mr. Rahe has built a reputation for his analytical approach to understanding his clients’ needs and managing large and diverse teams. Influenced by a history of extensive collaboration between the design and construction teams in his work, he is guiding the firm’s process and technology initiatives in support of industry trends towards integrated project delivery.

Mr. Rahe is also an avid proponent for the sustainability of environmental, capital, and human resources, an outlook shaped by his undergraduate studies in environmental design and reinforced during recent certification as a LEED AP.

He earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design/Architecture from Miami University.

Mr. Rahe can be contacted at 215-563-3900 or hmt@blta.com

Coming Up In The May Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability
The hotel industry continues to make remarkable progress in implementing sustainability policies and procedures in their properties throughout the world. As a result, they continue to reap the benefits of increased profitability, enhanced guest experiences, and improved community relations. In addition, as industry standards are codified and adopted worldwide, hotels can now compare how their operations measure up against their competitors in terms of sustainable practices and accomplishments. This capacity to publicly compare and contrast is spurring competition and driving innovation as hotels do not wish to be left behind in this area. Water management and conservation is still a primary issue as population growth, urbanization, pollution and wasteful consumption patterns place increasing demands on freshwater supply. Water recycling; installing low-flow fixtures; using digital sensors to control water usage; and even harvesting rainwater are just a few things that some hotels are doing to preserve this precious resource. Waste management is another major concern. Through policies of reduce, reuse and recycle, some hotels are implementing “zero-waste” programs with the goal of substantially reducing their landfill waste which produces carbon dioxide and methane gases. Other hotels have established comprehensive training programs that reinforce the value of sustainability. There is employee engagement through posters and quizzes, and even contests are held to increase innovation, sensitivity and environmental awareness. Some hotels are also monitoring a guest’s energy usage and rewarding those who consumed less energy with gifts and incentives. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating eco-friendly practices into their operations and how they and the environment are benefiting from them.