Mr. Rahe

Eric Rahe

Principal

BLT Architects

Eric M. Rahe is a principal and member of the executive leadership team at BLT Architects. Ericís thirty years of practice span the hospitality, residential, retail, commercial office, and educational sectors with a special focus on large-scale hospitality and resort projects.

Mr. Rahe has led projects at more than 17 hotels, ranging from limited service hotels to large-scale, multi-billion dollar resorts. Notable projects include The Marriott Center City Philadelphia, Lowes Philadelphia, Echelon Resort in Las Vegas, The Water Club and Borgata in Atlantic City, and Revel Resort in Atlantic City. Revel is a 6.3 million square foot beachfront destination in Atlantic City, New Jersey featuring 1,898 guest rooms, numerous culinary and lifestyle experiences and 150,000 square feet of gaming space.

Having developed a strong interest in how the design process influences the success of each project and a passion for clarity in design and communication, Mr. Rahe has built a reputation for his analytical approach to understanding his clientsí needs and managing large and diverse teams. Influenced by a history of extensive collaboration between the design and construction teams in his work, he is guiding the firmís process and technology initiatives in support of industry trends towards integrated project delivery.

Mr. Rahe is also an avid proponent for the sustainability of environmental, capital, and human resources, an outlook shaped by his undergraduate studies in environmental design and reinforced during recent certification as a LEED AP.

He earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design/Architecture from Miami University.

Mr. Rahe can be contacted at 215-563-3900 or hmt@blta.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.