Mr. Sullivan

Michael Sullivan

Shareholder

Greenberg Traurig

Michael Sullivan is the co-Managing Shareholder of the Orlando office of Greenberg Traurig and is the co-Chair of Greenberg Traurigís Hotels, Resorts and Clubs Practice Group.

Mr. Sullivan specializes in the representation of real estate developers, national hotel chains, lenders and owners in the purchase, development, finance, leasing, operation, management and licensing of hotels, condo-hotels, and resorts. He has extensive experience in the negotiation of both public and private hotel management contracts and has negotiated public/private ventures on behalf of hotel companies and owners with local governments and publicly owned convention centers. He has extensive experience in hotel insolvency proceedings including loan work-outs, foreclosures and bankruptcies. In addition, Mr. Sullivanís practice includes development of complex mixed use real estate developments and the purchase, sale and financing of retirement communities, medical office buildings and senior living communities.

Mr. Sullivan received his Juris Doctor degree, with Honors, from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 1984 and his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1980 from Yale University.

Mr. Sullivan can be contacted at 407-420-1000 or sullivanm@gtlaw.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.