Ms. Kurz

Gabriele Kurz

Executive Wellbeing Chef Talise Wellness

Jumeirah Group

As a vegetarian herself, Chef Gabriele (Gabi) Kurz joined Madinat Jumeirah in 2007, when she took on the role of Chef de Cuisine and developed the concept for a fine-dining restaurant specialising in wellbeing.

Over the years, her role has expanded and in 2011, she has been promoted to ‘Resort Wellbeing Chef’ of Madinat Jumeirah where she is developing a ‘wellbeing’ cuisine that is both wholesome and nutritionally well-balanced, using only organic and plant-based ingredients to the resort’s restaurants.

Chef Kurz is involved in menu development for all the signature restaurants in the resorts including in-room dining and Conference & Incentives events, as well as being responsible for the entire menu at Talise Spa. Her cooking classes are popular with Dubai residents and in-house guests alike.

Chef Kurz received her Master Hotelier from Steigenberger College of Hotel Management, in her home country of Germany, where she also took an apprenticeship at the Park Hilton Hotel in Munich. Following her apprenticeship, Chef Kurz managed a vegetarian fine dining restaurant and cookery school at the family hotel, situated in the mountains of Bavaria, Germany.

Chef Kurz conducts Educational and Nutritional Advisory classes and holds a certificate for Diabetic and Obesity Consultation; she is also the author of several celebrated vegetarian cookbooks, one of which was recently honoured with the ‘World Cookbook Award’ in Paris, 2011.

Ms. Kurz can be contacted at +971 4 366 6730 or gabriele.kurz@jumeirah.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.