Ms. Terry

Susan Terry

Vice President, Culinary Operations

Hyatt Hotels & Resorts

As vice president of culinary operations for Hyatt Hotels & Resorts, Susan Terry is responsible for strategic development of food and beverage concepts for full service and specialty restaurants in North America. She is also responsible for the development of catering event materials and menus.

Most recently, Ms. Terry served as director of culinary operations for Hyatt Hotels & Resorts, responsible for national programming, training, goals, procurement, food and beverage standards and franchise support. Prior to that, Ms. Terry was the senior executive chef at Grand Hyatt Washington in Washington D.C. In that role, she oversaw all food and beverage operations for the 900-room hotel, including five food and beverage outlets, 24-hour in-room dining and the hotel’s Kosher kitchen.

Ms. Terry began her career at Hyatt in 1990 at the former Hyatt Regency Suites on Michigan Avenue in Chicago as an executive sous chef. She then went on to hold executive chef positions at Hyatt Regency Harborside in Boston and the former Park Hyatt Los Angeles. She was awarded Hyatt’s most prestigious honor, the Donald N. Pritzker Award of Excellence for Operations, in 2003.

Ms. Terry can be contacted at 312-780-5709 or susan.terry@hyatt.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.