Ms. Millar

Michelle Millar

Assistant Professor Hospitality Management

University of San Francisco

Michelle Millar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Hospitality Management at the University of San Francisco. She received her undergraduate degree from UC Davis, her Masters of Tourism and Hospitality Management degree from Temple University in Philadelphia, and her doctoral degree in Hospitality Administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Ms. Millar has worked as a travel consultant in various types of travel agency settings for many years, and from 1998 until 2005 operated her own travel agency. She has extensive knowledge in vacation planning, meeting planning, corporate travel planning, and general business operations. In addition, she has worked in a small hotel, which provided her the opportunity to work in all departments of the operation. Her work experience has proven invaluable when teaching at the University of San Francisco.

Ms. Millar teaches Marketing in the Marketing Department, as well as Hotel Operations, Conference and Events Planning, and Sustainability in the Hospitality Industry in the Hospitality Management Department. She has also had the opportunity to teach both in the Hotel College at the University of Nevada of Las Vegas, and at UNLV’s campus in Singapore. While at UNLV, she was part of the hospitality sustainability committee that developed a process to train faculty to teach sustainability to students, and incorporate it into all required courses. Sustainability is an important component of all of the classes Ms. Millar teaches.

Her research areas include consumer behavior, in particular the wants and desires of travelers when selecting eco-friendly accommodations or tourism destinations, and why they make the decisions they do. Ms. Millar is also interested in how hotel managers relate to and work within the environment, and how we can make hospitality companies more environmentally friendly. Her research has been published in the Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Journal of Travel Research, Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality Management, and Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education, and she has presented her research at hospitality conferences throughout the world.

Ms. Millar can be contacted at 415-422-2498 or mmillar@usfca.edu

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.