Ms. Millar

Michelle Millar

Assistant Professor Hospitality Management

University of San Francisco

Michelle Millar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Hospitality Management at the University of San Francisco. She received her undergraduate degree from UC Davis, her Masters of Tourism and Hospitality Management degree from Temple University in Philadelphia, and her doctoral degree in Hospitality Administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Ms. Millar has worked as a travel consultant in various types of travel agency settings for many years, and from 1998 until 2005 operated her own travel agency. She has extensive knowledge in vacation planning, meeting planning, corporate travel planning, and general business operations. In addition, she has worked in a small hotel, which provided her the opportunity to work in all departments of the operation. Her work experience has proven invaluable when teaching at the University of San Francisco.

Ms. Millar teaches Marketing in the Marketing Department, as well as Hotel Operations, Conference and Events Planning, and Sustainability in the Hospitality Industry in the Hospitality Management Department. She has also had the opportunity to teach both in the Hotel College at the University of Nevada of Las Vegas, and at UNLV’s campus in Singapore. While at UNLV, she was part of the hospitality sustainability committee that developed a process to train faculty to teach sustainability to students, and incorporate it into all required courses. Sustainability is an important component of all of the classes Ms. Millar teaches.

Her research areas include consumer behavior, in particular the wants and desires of travelers when selecting eco-friendly accommodations or tourism destinations, and why they make the decisions they do. Ms. Millar is also interested in how hotel managers relate to and work within the environment, and how we can make hospitality companies more environmentally friendly. Her research has been published in the Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Journal of Travel Research, Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality Management, and Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education, and she has presented her research at hospitality conferences throughout the world.

Ms. Millar can be contacted at 415-422-2498 or mmillar@usfca.edu

Coming Up In The July Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Hotel Spa: Measuring the Results
As the Hotel Spa and Wellness Movement continues to flourish, spa operations are seeking new and innovative ways to expand their menu of services to attract even more people to their facilities, and to and measure the results of spa treatments. Whether it’s spa, fitness, wellness meet guest expectations. Among new developments, there seems to be a growing emphasis on science to define or beauty services, guests are becoming increasingly careful about what they ingest, inhale or put on their skin, and they are requesting scientific data on the treatments they receive. They are open to exploring the benefits of alternative therapies – like brain fitness exercises, electro-magnetic treatments, and chromotherapy – but only if they have been validated scientifically. Similarly, some spas are integrating select medical services and procedures into their operations, continuing the convergence of hotel spas with the medical world. Parents are also increasingly concerned about the health and well-being of their children and are willing to devote time and money to overcome their poor diets, constant stress, and hours spent hunched over computer, tablet and smartphone screens. Parents are investing in wellness-centric family vacations; yoga and massage for kids; mindfulness and meditation classes; and healthy, locally sourced, organic food. For hotel spas, this trend represents a significant area for future growth. Other trends include the proliferation of Wellness Festivals which celebrate health and well-being, and position hotel spas front and center. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.