Mr. Howe

Prentice Howe

VP, Executive Creative Director

Tocquigny

VP, Executive Creative Director at Tocquigny, Mr. Howe champions a culture of fresh ideas and oversees the development of integrated campaigns across a diverse client portfolio.

Mr. Howe has nearly twenty years of experience as a writer and creative director, working with some of America’s most iconic brands. Having previously worked in Dallas, Los Angeles and Detroit, he relies on his experiences with people from diverse backgrounds to craft authentic connections between brands and consumers. Ideas that make him think, “I wish I’d thought of that” inspire him and drive him to make each project better than the last.

Mr. Howe’s hotel and spa experience includes marketing work for Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort and Spa (San Antonio), the W Austin Hotel + Residences (Austin, TX), Horseshoe Bay Resort (Horseshoe Bay, TX), Hotel Nikko (San Francisco), St. Regis Hotel (Los Angeles), Wilshire Grand (Los Angeles), Red Mountain Resort & Spa (St. George, Utah), and Hotel Pattee (Perry, Iowa) and the Dallas / Fort Worth Area Tourism Council.

Prior to Tocquigny, Mr. Howe worked at Doner in Detroit. His account experience also includes Minute Maid, Fiat, Serta, JBL, The Dallas Stars Hockey Club, Texas Rangers Baseball, Habitat for Humanity, Anheuser-Busch, Petmate and Activision. He has written for Entrepreneur, BrandFreak, Sports Business Journal and PROMO.

Mr. Howe’s campaigns have been recognized by Cannes Lions, London International Advertising Awards, the Webby Awards, Communication Arts, Creativity and The New York Times.

Mr. Howe can be contacted at 512-532-2885 or phowe@tocquigny.com

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key
The challenge for hotel food and beverage operations is to serve the personal tastes and needs of an increasingly diverse population and, at the same time, to keep up with ever-evolving industry trends. In order to accomplish this, restaurateurs and hoteliers have to flex their creative muscles and pull out all the stops to satisfy their various audiences. One way to achieve this is to utilize existing food spaces in multiple ways at different times of the day. Lunch can be casual and fast, while dinnertime can be more formal and slower paced. The same restaurant can offer counter service by day but provide table service by night, with a completely different menu and atmosphere. Changes in music, lighting, uniforms and tabletop design contribute to its transformation. This multi- purpose approach seeks to meet the dining needs of guests as they change throughout the day. Today’s restaurants also have to go to great lengths to fulfill all the diverse dietary preferences of their guests. The popularity of plant-based, paleo, vegan, and gluten and allergen-free diets means that traditional menus must evolve from protein-heavy, carb-loaded offerings to those featuring more vegetables and legumes. Chefs are doing creative things with vegetables, such as experimenting with global cuisines or incorporating new vegetable hybrids into their dishes. Another trend is an emphasis on bold and creative flavors. From chili oil to sriracha to spicy maple syrup, entrees, desserts and beverages are all being enhanced with spice and heat. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.