Ms. Dickinson

Kristie Dickinson

Senior Vice President, Business Development and Marketing

CHMWarnick

Kristie Dickinson brings more than 25 years of hospitality industry experience, including operations, asset management, acquisition and investment analysis to her current role as Senior Vice President for CHMWarnick (CHMW), a leading hotel asset management and owner advisory services company. Ms. Dickinson is responsible for corporate marketing, public relations and business development, as well as supporting strategic planning efforts for a client portfolio of more than 50 hotels with 22,000 guestrooms, collectively valued at $10 billion under asset management.

She specializes in revenue management practices, sales and marketing effectiveness and market positioning. Ms. Dickinson has worked with more than 200 hotels of all product types and brands, and understands how to identify opportunities for achieving client goals through CHMWís comprehensive suite of services. She is a member of the Hospitality Sales & Marketing Association International (HSMAI), the International Society of Hospitality Consultants (ISHC) and serves the Committee Chair for the Lori E. Raleigh Award for Emerging Excellence in Hospitality Consulting.

Ms. Dickinson is a regularly contributing author to several industry publications on the subjects of hotel ownership, investment, hotel asset management and revenue strategies. She is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Hotel Administration, and minored in Anthropology. She also has a certificate in Revenue Management from Cornell University.

In her free time, she enjoys spending time with family, skiing and volunteering for the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless.

Please visit www.chmwarnick.com for more information.

Ms. Dickinson can be contacted at 978-522-7002 or kdickinson@chmwarnick.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.