Ms. Borgman

Peggy Borgman

President

Preston Wynne, Inc.

Peggy Wynne Borgman is CEO of Preston Wynne, Inc., which was founded in 1984 and currently operates two spa facilities, one a luxury day spa and the other a hotel spa, in the San Francisco Bay Area. Today the company employs 60+ bodyworkers, estheticians, nail technicians, spa concierges, housekeepers, and managers.

Ms. Borgman is also principal consultant and seminar leader for Preston Wynne's business-to-business division, which has offered consulting and training services to the spa industry since 1994. Clients of the B2B division have included Hyatt Hotels, Four Seasons, Ritz Carlton, Shangri-La, the Peninsula Group, Treasure Island Resort and Casino, Glen Ivy Hot Springs Spas, East West College of the Healing Arts and Gold's Gym.

The author of the consumer title Four Seasons of Inner and Outer Beauty: Spa Rituals for Well-Being, from Random House, Ms. Borgman is also a frequent contributor to spa industry magazines and a highly-rated speaker for trade events such as ISPA, IESC and the American Spa Expo. Her commentary on the spa industry has been featured in USA Today and Time magazine.

She is a member of the board of directors for Next Door Solutions, a domestic violence agency in Santa Clara, California, where she works to put the healing and fundraising resources of spas to work in aiding victims of domestic abuse.

Ms. Borgman can be contacted at (408) 741-1750 ext 30 or pwb@prestonwynne.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.