Ms. Borgman

Peggy Borgman

President

Preston Wynne, Inc.

Peggy Wynne Borgman is CEO of Preston Wynne, Inc., which was founded in 1984 and currently operates two spa facilities, one a luxury day spa and the other a hotel spa, in the San Francisco Bay Area. Today the company employs 60+ bodyworkers, estheticians, nail technicians, spa concierges, housekeepers, and managers.

Ms. Borgman is also principal consultant and seminar leader for Preston Wynne's business-to-business division, which has offered consulting and training services to the spa industry since 1994. Clients of the B2B division have included Hyatt Hotels, Four Seasons, Ritz Carlton, Shangri-La, the Peninsula Group, Treasure Island Resort and Casino, Glen Ivy Hot Springs Spas, East West College of the Healing Arts and Gold's Gym.

The author of the consumer title Four Seasons of Inner and Outer Beauty: Spa Rituals for Well-Being, from Random House, Ms. Borgman is also a frequent contributor to spa industry magazines and a highly-rated speaker for trade events such as ISPA, IESC and the American Spa Expo. Her commentary on the spa industry has been featured in USA Today and Time magazine.

She is a member of the board of directors for Next Door Solutions, a domestic violence agency in Santa Clara, California, where she works to put the healing and fundraising resources of spas to work in aiding victims of domestic abuse.

Ms. Borgman can be contacted at (408) 741-1750 ext 30 or pwb@prestonwynne.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.