Mr. Bowen

John T. Bowen

Dean & Barron Hilton Distinguished Chair at the Conrad N. Hilton College

University of Houston

John Bowen is Dean of the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management. He has presented marketing courses and seminars in Asia, Australia, Central America, Europe, Mexico and South America, and has published over 100 articles on marketing. He is also the North American Research Director for World Wide Hospitality Trends.

Dr. Bowen is a coauthor of Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, the leading hospitality marketing textbook in the world. Currently, it is published in nine languages. He is also the coauthor of Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. A recipient of numerous awards for both his teaching and research, Dr. Bowen is a three-time recipient of CHRIE's Wiley Research Award, formerly the Van Nostrand Reinhold Research Award, which recognizes lifetime research achievements in the hospitality field. His research focus is on customer service, customer loyalty and electronic distributing systems for service industries.

Dean Bowen's industry experience is in the area of food and beverage. He has worked in hotels, freestanding restaurants and as the corporate food and beverage manager of a hotel management company. For 15 years, he owned and operated Theodore Zinck's in downtown Dallas.

A dedicated educator, Dr. Bowen started his teaching career in 1978 at Del Mar College's Restaurant Management Program. He was an assistant professor at the Hilton College from 1980 to 1990. In 1990, he left to teach at Bond University in Australia and returned to the United States in 1993 to take a position at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He returned to the Hilton College as Dean in 2003.

Expertise & Research Interests

• Customer Satisfaction • Customer Loyalty • New Product Development • Casino Player Behavior

Selected Publications

  • Kotler, P., Bowen, J. & Makens, J. (2006). Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, N. J.: Prentice Hall. Published in eight languages.

  • Shock, P. Bowen, J. & Stefanelli, J. (2004). Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Published in three languages.

  • Mayer, K. Bowen, J. & Moulton, M. (2003). A Proposed Model of Service Descriptors, The Journal of Services Marketing, 17(6), 621-639.

  • Sparks, B., Bowen, J. & Klag, S. (2003). Restaurants and the Tourist Market. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 15(1), 6-13.

  • Bowen, J. & Ford, R. (2002). Does Having a Thing Make a Difference? Journal of Management, 28(3), 447-469.

  • Lucas, A. & Bowen, J. (2002). An Analysis of Slot Promotions. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 21(2), 189-202. Received the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism.

  • Su, W. & Bowen, J. (2001). Restaurant Customer Complaint Behavior. Journal of Restaurant and Foodservice Marketing, 4(2), 35-65.

  • Bowen, J. & Shaing-Lih C. (2001). The Relationship Between Customer Loyalty and Customer Satisfaction. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 13(5), 13-17. Awarded Best Article for 2001.

  • Nelson, K. & Bowen, J. (2000). Employee uniforms: Their impact on customer and employee satisfaction. Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 41(2), 86-95.

  • Bowen, J., & Shoemaker, S. (2003). Loyalty: A Strategic Commitment. Cornell Hotel & Restaurant Administration Quarterly, 44(5/6), 31-46. Awarded the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism.

  • Makens, J. & Bowen, J. (1996). Increasing Profits Through Product Merchandising. The Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 37(1), 72-79.

Mr. Bowen can be contacted at 713-743-0209 or jtbowen@Central.UH.EDU

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Group Meetings: Blue Skies Ahead
After a decade of sacrifice and struggle, it seems that hotels and meeting planners have every reason to be optimistic about the group meeting business going forward. By every industry benchmark and measure, 2017 is shaping up to be a record year, which means more meetings in more locations for more attendees. And though no one in the industry is complaining about this rosy outlook, the strong demand is increasing competition among meeting planners across the board – for the most desirable locations, for the best hotels, for the most creative experiences, for the most talented chefs, and for the best technology available. Because of this robust demand, hotels are in the driver’s seat and they are flexing their collective muscles. Even though over 100,000 new rooms were added last year, hotel rates are expected to rise by a minimum of 4.0%, and they are also charging fees on amenities that were often gratis in the past. In addition, hotels are offering shorter lead times on booking commitments, forcing planners to sign contracts earlier than in past years. Planners are having to work more quickly and to commit farther in advance to secure key properties. Planners are also having to meet increased attendee expectations. They no longer are content with a trade show and a few dinners; they want an experience. Planners need to find ways to create a meaningful experience to ensure that attendees walk away with an impactful memory. This kind of experiential learning can generate a deeper emotional connection, which can ultimately result in increased brand recognition, client retention, and incremental sales. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group business and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.