Mr. Bowen

John T. Bowen

Dean & Barron Hilton Distinguished Chair at the Conrad N. Hilton College

University of Houston

John Bowen is Dean of the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management. He has presented marketing courses and seminars in Asia, Australia, Central America, Europe, Mexico and South America, and has published over 100 articles on marketing. He is also the North American Research Director for World Wide Hospitality Trends.

Dr. Bowen is a coauthor of Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, the leading hospitality marketing textbook in the world. Currently, it is published in nine languages. He is also the coauthor of Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. A recipient of numerous awards for both his teaching and research, Dr. Bowen is a three-time recipient of CHRIE's Wiley Research Award, formerly the Van Nostrand Reinhold Research Award, which recognizes lifetime research achievements in the hospitality field. His research focus is on customer service, customer loyalty and electronic distributing systems for service industries.

Dean Bowen's industry experience is in the area of food and beverage. He has worked in hotels, freestanding restaurants and as the corporate food and beverage manager of a hotel management company. For 15 years, he owned and operated Theodore Zinck's in downtown Dallas.

A dedicated educator, Dr. Bowen started his teaching career in 1978 at Del Mar College's Restaurant Management Program. He was an assistant professor at the Hilton College from 1980 to 1990. In 1990, he left to teach at Bond University in Australia and returned to the United States in 1993 to take a position at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He returned to the Hilton College as Dean in 2003.

Expertise & Research Interests

• Customer Satisfaction • Customer Loyalty • New Product Development • Casino Player Behavior

Selected Publications

  • Kotler, P., Bowen, J. & Makens, J. (2006). Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, N. J.: Prentice Hall. Published in eight languages.

  • Shock, P. Bowen, J. & Stefanelli, J. (2004). Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Published in three languages.

  • Mayer, K. Bowen, J. & Moulton, M. (2003). A Proposed Model of Service Descriptors, The Journal of Services Marketing, 17(6), 621-639.

  • Sparks, B., Bowen, J. & Klag, S. (2003). Restaurants and the Tourist Market. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 15(1), 6-13.

  • Bowen, J. & Ford, R. (2002). Does Having a Thing Make a Difference? Journal of Management, 28(3), 447-469.

  • Lucas, A. & Bowen, J. (2002). An Analysis of Slot Promotions. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 21(2), 189-202. Received the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism.

  • Su, W. & Bowen, J. (2001). Restaurant Customer Complaint Behavior. Journal of Restaurant and Foodservice Marketing, 4(2), 35-65.

  • Bowen, J. & Shaing-Lih C. (2001). The Relationship Between Customer Loyalty and Customer Satisfaction. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 13(5), 13-17. Awarded Best Article for 2001.

  • Nelson, K. & Bowen, J. (2000). Employee uniforms: Their impact on customer and employee satisfaction. Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 41(2), 86-95.

  • Bowen, J., & Shoemaker, S. (2003). Loyalty: A Strategic Commitment. Cornell Hotel & Restaurant Administration Quarterly, 44(5/6), 31-46. Awarded the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism.

  • Makens, J. & Bowen, J. (1996). Increasing Profits Through Product Merchandising. The Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 37(1), 72-79.

Mr. Bowen can be contacted at 713-743-0209 or jtbowen@Central.UH.EDU

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.