Ms. Seay

Lisa Seay

Founder

Element C

Lisa Seay is on a mission to help individuals find their professional purpose (and power!) and help companies develop cost-effective, efficient and sustainable talent management strategies. As founder of the coaching/consulting firm element c, Ms. Seay leverages her HR background to provide individual and team coaching, leadership development and team building services. By working in myriad environments during her 25-year corporate career—including startups, mergers and acquisitions, franchised organizations and large entities with multi-state locations—she knows firsthand how challenging organizational situations impact workforce performance, employee engagement and personal career growth.

Prior to launching element c in 2015, Ms. Seay held talent management and HR director roles in a variety of organizations, including A.T. Kearney, YUM! Brands and Baylor Health Care System. During Ms. Seay’s tenure at Yum! Brands/Pizza Hut, Inc., she managed a $500K employee marketing initiative that attracted 250,000+ job seekers to the company’s new online application system in three months. Most recently, she served as a National Director of Human Resources at Conifer Health Solutions in Frisco, Texas, where she led a team that supported 3,000+ employees.

In the book Humans@Work, Ms. Seay joined with other HR professionals to address some of the top challenges employers face in today’s marketplace. In her chapter, Elements of the Lost and Found Spirit, Ms. Seay explores how to identify when one has lost their uniqueness when it comes to their work and what leaders can do to support those individuals in being their best at work.

A proponent of life-long learning, Ms. Seay holds a Graduate Certificate in Executive Coaching from the University of Texas at Dallas and is a Certified Lumina Learning Practitioner. Ms. Seay lives outside Dallas with her husband, Brian, who works in the financial services industry, and their young daughters. She is the New Family Liaison at her children’s school and also serves on the personnel committee at her church.

Please visit http://www.theelementc.com for more information.

Ms. Seay can be contacted at 214-394-7308 or lisa@theelementc.com

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.