Mr. Sanchez

Frank Sanchez

Executive Chef

Chicago Downtown Marriott

Chicago Downtown Marriott Magnificent Mile Executive Chef Frank Sanchez, formerly the hotelís executive sous chef, oversees all culinary operations at the hotel and its F&B outlets, Harvest Restaurant and Rush Street Pantry, including management of the hotelís rooftop garden and beehives. Chef Sanchez also operates a year-round, on-site experience to create food from scratch that gives customers fresh and nutritional options. Chef and his team begin the seedling process of planting product that can be grown indoors, along with rotating crop of micro-greens. He strives to grow product, reduce the hotelís carbon footprint and create an interesting narrative for the hotel and restaurants. As well as menu planning, Chef Sanchez executes the garden aesthetics, as the rooftop garden can be seen from 36 of the hotelís 46 floors and from the fitness center, which is located on the same floor as the rooftop garden. The neat rows and tight lines in the boxes are an extension of the kitchen, and show guests that there are crops growing.

Chef Sanchez has been with the company since 2010 and has demonstrated superior leadership in the culinary department. Prior to joining the Chicago Marriott, Chef Sanchez led kitchen operations as executive chef at Coronado Island Marriott Resort and Spa and led the banquet kitchen at JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa. Chef Sanchezís career highlights include creating the first-ever beer festival on Coronado Island while at Marriott.

Before being hired by Marriott, Chef Sanchez graduated with a degree in business management from the University of Arizona in 2005.

Please visit http://www.marriott.com for more information.

Mr. Sanchez can be contacted at 312-836-0100 or frank.sanchez@marriott.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, itís that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort Ė one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms Ė they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.