Mr. Hancock

Paul Hancock

Executive Chef

Miramonte Resort and Spa

Chef Paul Hancock took an interest in the kitchen at an early age. “I remember walking to the other side of the island and running home all wide-eyed, ‘Mom, they fry their fish in peanut oil over there!’” He explains, “I just had that fascination with how other people did things, how they lived their lives and cooked their food.” And so began a path of culinary discovery, rich with fine dining experiences at exclusive supper clubs in North Carolina, and some of the South’s legendary restaurants.

Ever eager for new challenges, Chef Hancock traveled to the French Alps to accomplish his chef’s apprenticeship at L’auberge de L’Eridian under the tutelage of Chef Marc Veyrat—at the time a 3-star Michelin chef renowned for his foraging and use of wild herbs and ingredients. Chef Hancock quickly grasped the concept of great recipes and the meticulous steps that go into implementing them.

Not one to rest on his laurels, Chef Hancock’s craftsmanship, resourcefulness, and wanderlust turned out to be a perfect match for super mega yachts; he spent 3 ˝ years executing elaborate dinner parties while traveling the world with elite guests and international celebrities.

Back in the States, Chef Hancock was instrumental in opening five-star fine dining and banquet experiences in Hollywood, Florida, including the now Diplomat Resort and Spa, receiving the four star four diamond award from AAA. Here in California, Chef Paul has been called on by a long list of celebrity clients.

Chef Hancock now calls Indian Wells home, delighted to share his farm-to-table values and focus on building new relationships in the small community of Indian Wells.

Please visit http://miramonteresort.com for more information.

Mr. Hancock can be contacted at 760-837-1631 or phancock@destinationhotels.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.