Mr. Grenwell

David Grenwell

Sales Director

Shortridge Laundry

David Greenwell is sales director of Shortridge Laundry and Linen Hire, supplying many high-end hotels - Rockliffe Hall, The Samling and Stobo Castle, for example - along with hundreds of smaller hotels and guests houses across Northern Britain. Originally based near Keswick in Cumbria, North West Laundries was founded by David and Peter Hinckley in 1993. The company provided linen hire and laundry services to hotels and other local businesses throughout the Lakes. The rapid growth of the company meant a new, larger site was soon needed and the move to Lillyhall Industrial Estate was completed in 1996.

By 2005 North West Laundries supplied businesses throughout Cumbria and the Borders. The acquisition of Shortridge enabled them to move into Scotland. In 2008 a depot was opened in Thirsk allowing the company to cover more of the North East and North Yorkshire, with further expansion in that region facilitated by the new Darlington depot.

Investment in machinery has continued: in 2014, the company invested well over 1M in state-of-the-art laundry equipment, including washers, dryers, and ironers. Annual investment of over 750,000 in the best linen and towels from around the world helps to keep Shortridge's standards at the forefront of the industry.

Last year, Mr. Greenwell commissioned a [short video][1] of the large Lillyhall laundry, for the benefit of those customers who are curious as to just how their linen is cared for.

Please visit https://www.shortridgelaundry.co.uk/ for more information.

Mr. Grenwell can be contacted at 01900 606696 or info@shortridge.co.uk

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, its that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.