Mr. Sentman

Shannon Sentman

Chief Executive Officer & Founder

SOL VISTA

Shannon Sentman, Esq., MSRE, LEED AP®, is a recovering big-firm attorney, wanna-be programmer, and the Co-founder and CEO of SOL VISTA. Since co-founding SOL VISTA in 2010, his leadership has established the company as the hotel energy experts, positioning its Skywalk™ platform as the best utility cost and building efficiency management tool available to the hotel sector. Skywalk now serves over two hundred subscribed hotels located throughout the U.S.

In addition to his work with SOL VISTA, Mr. Sentman is a frequent lecturer at Johns Hopkins, Georgetown and other universities, a former adjunct professor at University of Maryland, and an oft published author. His publications include the U.S. Green Building Council’s “Green Office Guide” and the American Bar Association’s “Green Building and Sustainable Development: A Practical Legal Guide.”

Before co-founding SOL VISTA, Mr. Sentman practiced as an attorney, federal lobbyist, and strategic consultant with the international law firm Holland & Knight. While there he built a unique, cross-disciplinary practice counseling clients, such as Forest City, McKinsey & Company, PricewaterhouseCoopers, USGBC, Goldman Sachs, Rohm and Haas, and Fortune Brands, on environmental sustainability-related and real estate matters.

In addition to his law degree, Mr. Sentman earned a M.S. in Real Estate from Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and was one of the first attorneys to earn the designation of LEED AP® from the U.S. Green Building Council.

In his personal life, Mr. Sentman left behind life on a sailboat to raise young boy/girl twins while trying to find time to run a few days each week.

Please visit http://www.solvista.com for more information.

Mr. Sentman can be contacted at 410-456-8044 or ssentman@solvista.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.