Mr. Lally

Bill Lally

President

Mode:Green

Bill Lally is the president of hospitality integration firm Mode:Green. A serial entrepreneur, Mr. Lally has extensive experience and a unique background in a variety of areas ranging from commercial audiovisual and control systems to energy management, broadcast, recording, post-production and hospitality. In 2008, the culmination of this experience resulted in the successful foundation of Mode:Green, which provides advanced control systems and energy management in the hospitality and commercial markets with the goal of bridging the current gap between integrators, MEP engineers and contractors, GCs, lighting designers and architects. Capitalizing on having become the first LEED-AP / Crestron Master’s Level Certified programmer, Mr. Lally grew Mode:Green from a small independent programming house (with clients such as Disney, Four Seasons, Baccarat, 1 Hotel and even NASA), to an enterprise completing several fully integrated multi-million dollar projects over the past five years. Mode:Green has become the foremost authority in meeting the demands of the luxury hospitality market and the ever-changing technology expectations of the world’s most advanced hotel guest rooms.

Mr. Lally is on top of new technology trends in the latest and upcoming audio/video, energy management and automation technologies to use in work for his clients, and is a continuous technology tinkerer on the side. He was also a founding member of the STEP InfoComm Task Force and is part of the InfoComm Smart Building Task Force, which drew on his ability to create energy management solutions for commercial buildings. Mr. Lally attended the University of Miami for Music and Audio Engineering, and is a member of the US Green Building Council.

Please visit http://www.modegreen.com for more information.

Mr. Lally can be contacted at 407-574-6245 or info@modegreen.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.