Mr. Caughlin

Ron Caughlin

Senior Vice President Brand & Digital Strategy

RadonicRodgers Strategy+

Ron Caughlin has over 20 years of marketing and brand experience in both the agency and client side of the business. His area of expertise includes marketing, brand strategy, digital, PR and social media. Mr. Caughlin has a Bachelors degree from the University of Toronto and Master Studies in Communications from University of Calgary.

Currently Mr. Caughlin is Sr. Vice President Brand & Digital Strategy for RadonicRodgers Strategy+, a brand and digital marketing agency specializing in Travel & Tourism marketing. Ron leads RadonicRodgers Strategy+ client brand strategy, client training and workshops, digital PR and marketing initiatives at Canada’s leading firm in award-winning Travel & Tourism marketing.

Mr. Caughlin honed his marketing communications career at some of Canada's top agencies starting with BBDO as an Account Director and then VP, Clients Services at Cossette as well as the Managing Director for CIM, - LAUNCH. He had the opportunity to lead some very notable national clients including the McDonalds national campaign and the Bell power brand strategy and activation. Most recently Mr. Caughlin created the inbound marketing, PR and social media program for TNS Canada as VP, Marketing. In addition, he was the practice lead for the Travel & Tourism and Digital Sectors and led the global Digital Life and Mobile Life studies.

Mr. Caughlin built the marketing program from the ground up, at the GTAA (Toronto Pearson) as the Vice President Marketing and created the digital marketing partnership with Air Canada, Tourism Toronto and OTMPC. He also developed the "There's no place like this" campaign for the Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership (OTMPC) as Director, Brand and North America Marketing.

Mr. Caughlin is also a part-time professor at Humber – School of Hospitality, Recreation & Tourism where he teaches PR and Social Media, Consumer Insight and Marketing Research, Sport Tourism, Sport Finance, Mobile Marketing and e-Business and Technology. He also volunteers his time as the Sr. Vice President of Global Alliance for IIMP with a framework that consists of a core team that includes 4 vice presidents, each responsible for a different global zone and global team that includes 17 regional directors who are responsible for supervising and monitoring country managers within their regions.

Please visit http://www.radonicrodgers.com for more information.

Mr. Caughlin can be contacted at 416-695-0575 or ron@radonicrodgers.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.