Mr. Tang

Oliver Tang

Analyst

Horwath HTL

Oliver Tang is a recent graduate of Cornell Universityís School of Hotel Administration with a Bachelorís degree in Hotel Administration and a minor in Real Estate. He joined Horwath HTL as an intern in January 2015 and returned as an analyst in July 2016. Mr. Tang has various work experience in the hospitality industry, including operations, market analysis, asset management and feasibility studies. A native of China, Mr. Tang is fluent in Mandarin Chinese and English.

He first started his career as a front desk agent at Brahmaputra Grand Hotel in Lhasa, Tibet. He then became the assistant front office manager, overseeing the operation of the department.

During his time at Cornell, Mr. Tang gained extensive internship experiences, including the Sales and Marketing Department at Yufu Hot Spring Resort in Chengdu, the Sales Department at Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort in Orlando, and the Finance and Accounting Department at St. Regis in San Francisco. He also interned with the hotel advisory and overseas investment teams at Jones Lang LaSalle in Beijing, where he helped with a number of development feasibility studies and an overseas hotel acquisition.

Mr. Tang holds CHIA and REFM level 3 certifications. At school, he worked as a teaching assistant for Hotel Development & Planning and Marketing Principles. In addition, Oliver is the co-founder of AH&LA Cornell Student Chapter and served as the chief editor of Global China Focus, a student-run publication.

Please visit http://www.horwathhtl.us for more information.

Mr. Tang can be contacted at 607-379-9873 or otang@horwathHTL.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.