Mr. O'Day

Michael P. O'Day

Vice President, Wireless Networks

Corning Optical Communications

Mike O’Day is the vice president of the wireless market department at Corning Optical Communications, which is a sector within Corning Inc. that’s specialized in fiber and wireless solutions for communications networks. Since assuming this role in February 2015, O’Day has spent the past two years leading Corning’s wireless business unit. He is responsible for creating new markets and demand for the Corning® ONE™ wireless platform, an all-optical solution for enterprises’ cellular, Wi-Fi and Ethernet backhaul needs.

Mr. O’Day is a telecom industry veteran with over two decades of experience. He joined the Corning family in 1998 with Siecor, which later became Corning Cable Systems (CCS). He worked in both strategy and marketing organizations for CCS through 2003 and helped lead Corning’s entry into the Latin American cable and connectivity business. As a knowledgeable wireless leader, Mr. O’Day brings a keen understanding of the wireless market and the requirements to be successful in this business.

From 2004 to 2010, Mr. O’Day worked in CCS’s optical connectivity product line management organizations where he helped launch CCS’s fiber-to-the-home product lines in support of Verizon’s FiOS initiative. In 2010, O’Day became the program manager for Corning’s IDAS Wireless Program, culminating in the acquisition of MobileAccess in 2011. Following the acquisition, he served as chief of staff in the CCS technology organization.

Mr. O’Day received his undergraduate degree from the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. in 1991 and his M.B.A. from Minnesota State University (Mankato) in 1998. He currently resides in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Please visit http://www.corning.com for more information.

Mr. O'Day can be contacted at 607-974-9000 or michael.oday@corning.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.