Mr. Lindsay

Matt Lindsay

President

Mather Economics LLC

Matt Lindsay has more than 20 years of experience in helping businesses improve performance and drive revenue through economic modeling. In consulting roles over the past 15 years, he has shared this expertise and developed pricing strategies and predictive models for clients, including the Intercontinental Exchange, Gannett, The Home Depot, NRG Energy, Tribune, IHG, McClatchy, the Everglades Foundation, the Walton Foundation, Dow Jones, and The New York Times. Prior to joining Mather Economics, Lindsay worked with the Corporate Economics Group to leverage information on price elasticity and marginal network costs to improve profitability by customer for the United Parcel Service (UPS). He began his consulting career with Arthur Andersen, working in the firm’s Atlanta strategy practice.

Lindsay’s extensive experience in marketing spend effectiveness optimization, customer retention, analysis and the resulting predictive models have been used to support strategic pricing decisions, marketing initiatives and customer acquisition tactics, ultimately generating millions of dollars in incremental profits for his clients. He is a sought after expert and frequently speaks at industry events including the NAA’s MediaXchange, the INMA World Congress, and the WAN-IFRA World Newspaper Conference. Lindsay has a doctorate in economics from the University of Georgia, a master of applied economics from Clemson University and an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Georgia.

Please visit http://www.mathereconomics.com. for more information.

Mr. Lindsay can be contacted at 770-993-4111 or matt@mathereconmics.com

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key
The challenge for hotel food and beverage operations is to serve the personal tastes and needs of an increasingly diverse population and, at the same time, to keep up with ever-evolving industry trends. In order to accomplish this, restaurateurs and hoteliers have to flex their creative muscles and pull out all the stops to satisfy their various audiences. One way to achieve this is to utilize existing food spaces in multiple ways at different times of the day. Lunch can be casual and fast, while dinnertime can be more formal and slower paced. The same restaurant can offer counter service by day but provide table service by night, with a completely different menu and atmosphere. Changes in music, lighting, uniforms and tabletop design contribute to its transformation. This multi- purpose approach seeks to meet the dining needs of guests as they change throughout the day. Today’s restaurants also have to go to great lengths to fulfill all the diverse dietary preferences of their guests. The popularity of plant-based, paleo, vegan, and gluten and allergen-free diets means that traditional menus must evolve from protein-heavy, carb-loaded offerings to those featuring more vegetables and legumes. Chefs are doing creative things with vegetables, such as experimenting with global cuisines or incorporating new vegetable hybrids into their dishes. Another trend is an emphasis on bold and creative flavors. From chili oil to sriracha to spicy maple syrup, entrees, desserts and beverages are all being enhanced with spice and heat. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.