Mr. Lindsay

Matt Lindsay

President

Mather Economics LLC

Matt Lindsay has more than 20 years of experience in helping businesses improve performance and drive revenue through economic modeling. In consulting roles over the past 15 years, he has shared this expertise and developed pricing strategies and predictive models for clients, including the Intercontinental Exchange, Gannett, The Home Depot, NRG Energy, Tribune, IHG, McClatchy, the Everglades Foundation, the Walton Foundation, Dow Jones, and The New York Times. Prior to joining Mather Economics, Lindsay worked with the Corporate Economics Group to leverage information on price elasticity and marginal network costs to improve profitability by customer for the United Parcel Service (UPS). He began his consulting career with Arthur Andersen, working in the firmís Atlanta strategy practice.

Lindsayís extensive experience in marketing spend effectiveness optimization, customer retention, analysis and the resulting predictive models have been used to support strategic pricing decisions, marketing initiatives and customer acquisition tactics, ultimately generating millions of dollars in incremental profits for his clients. He is a sought after expert and frequently speaks at industry events including the NAAís MediaXchange, the INMA World Congress, and the WAN-IFRA World Newspaper Conference. Lindsay has a doctorate in economics from the University of Georgia, a master of applied economics from Clemson University and an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Georgia.

Please visit http://www.mathereconomics.com. for more information.

Mr. Lindsay can be contacted at 770-993-4111 or matt@mathereconmics.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.