Mr. Lindsay

Matt Lindsay

President

Mather Economics LLC

Matt Lindsay has more than 20 years of experience in helping businesses improve performance and drive revenue through economic modeling. In consulting roles over the past 15 years, he has shared this expertise and developed pricing strategies and predictive models for clients, including the Intercontinental Exchange, Gannett, The Home Depot, NRG Energy, Tribune, IHG, McClatchy, the Everglades Foundation, the Walton Foundation, Dow Jones, and The New York Times. Prior to joining Mather Economics, Lindsay worked with the Corporate Economics Group to leverage information on price elasticity and marginal network costs to improve profitability by customer for the United Parcel Service (UPS). He began his consulting career with Arthur Andersen, working in the firm’s Atlanta strategy practice.

Lindsay’s extensive experience in marketing spend effectiveness optimization, customer retention, analysis and the resulting predictive models have been used to support strategic pricing decisions, marketing initiatives and customer acquisition tactics, ultimately generating millions of dollars in incremental profits for his clients. He is a sought after expert and frequently speaks at industry events including the NAA’s MediaXchange, the INMA World Congress, and the WAN-IFRA World Newspaper Conference. Lindsay has a doctorate in economics from the University of Georgia, a master of applied economics from Clemson University and an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Georgia.

Please visit http://www.mathereconomics.com. for more information.

Mr. Lindsay can be contacted at 770-993-4111 or matt@mathereconmics.com

Coming Up In The May Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability
The hotel industry continues to make remarkable progress in implementing sustainability policies and procedures in their properties throughout the world. As a result, they continue to reap the benefits of increased profitability, enhanced guest experiences, and improved community relations. In addition, as industry standards are codified and adopted worldwide, hotels can now compare how their operations measure up against their competitors in terms of sustainable practices and accomplishments. This capacity to publicly compare and contrast is spurring competition and driving innovation as hotels do not wish to be left behind in this area. Water management and conservation is still a primary issue as population growth, urbanization, pollution and wasteful consumption patterns place increasing demands on freshwater supply. Water recycling; installing low-flow fixtures; using digital sensors to control water usage; and even harvesting rainwater are just a few things that some hotels are doing to preserve this precious resource. Waste management is another major concern. Through policies of reduce, reuse and recycle, some hotels are implementing “zero-waste” programs with the goal of substantially reducing their landfill waste which produces carbon dioxide and methane gases. Other hotels have established comprehensive training programs that reinforce the value of sustainability. There is employee engagement through posters and quizzes, and even contests are held to increase innovation, sensitivity and environmental awareness. Some hotels are also monitoring a guest’s energy usage and rewarding those who consumed less energy with gifts and incentives. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating eco-friendly practices into their operations and how they and the environment are benefiting from them.