Ms. Hart

Christina Hart

Senior Principal / Director of Hospitality Interiors

HOK New York

Christina Hart has honed a niche in designing signature restaurants, premier spas and upscale luxury suites and hotels. She has overseen the renovation of the historic Hotel du Parc in Switzerland for Kempinski; The Fairmont Oman Resort in the Persian Gulf; select spaces of the world renowned Waldorf Astoria in New York as well as design renovations and new builds four- and five-star hospitality projects in the U.S. and around the world.

Ms. Hart‘s diverse roster of projects also includes completing corporate interiors for: Nestlé Waters North America, Merrill Lynch, Met Life and Morgan Stanley during her tenure at both Haverson Architecture & Design and WBTL.

Recent work includes: a refresh of the Asiate Restaurant, renovating the One Bedroom Suites and concept and design of the penthouse space, Suite 5000, all at the Mandarin Oriental New York; select spaces at the Statler Hotel of Cornell University; and the InterContinental Hotel at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. Ms. Hart’s re-design of the Al Faisaliah in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia will open in 2017. The premier resort, which was built a decade ago by Lord Norman Foster, is located in a towering skyscraper and celebrated as one of Riyadh’s most impressive properties, catering to discerning business and international visitors. Her launch of the first Melia Hotel in North America earned a Gold Key Award in 2012.

A frequent lecturer and panelist, she has spoken at Cornell’s Center for Hospitality Design Research Roundtable at the Cornell Hotel School. Ms. Hart holds a B.S. in Design & Environmental Analysis from Cornell University. Prior to BBG-BBGM’s merging with HOK, she was an Interiors Partner.

Please visit http://www.hok.com for more information.

Ms. Hart can be contacted at 646-385-7653 or christina.hart@hok.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.