Mr. Hartwright

Nick Hartwright

Co-Founder

Mill and Company Project

Nick Hartwright is one of London's leading social entrepreneurs. He is a huge supporter of the arts and culture-based projects, and wants to make them accessible to all. In the first instance he is a place-maker and has been, and is, involved in a number of exciting regeneration projects in the capital that are ultimately making people's lives, and communities, better.

His projects are about regeneration not gentrification, and all of Mr. Hartwright's spaces are sustainable, deliverable and affordable. He takes on derelict buildings, places that might be crumbling, and works with local authorities to restore them, give them a new lease of life and make them focal points in local and creative communities. Mr. Hartwright's is committed to making London's art scene flourish, and is incredibly supportive of creative minds. To this end, he recently opened Green Rooms, the UKs first arts-led independent social enterprise hotel. Situated on Station Road in Wood Green, it is already changing the shape and face of the area.

Mr. Hartwirght is co-founder of The Mill Co. Project, a social enterprise that provides work and project spaces at extremely competitive rates for artists and small creative companies. Tenants are provided with a space to work in, performance areas and stages to put on shows or exhibitions by night, a network of other artists to collaborate with, a creative agency they can work with, and a store where they can sell their products. Under Nick's stewardship the The Mill Co. Project has grown incredibly quickly. Starting in 2010, it now operates nearly 100,000 square foot of workspace, theatre space, cafes, bars and restaurants across London, and supports over 100 SMEs.

Mr. Hartwright can be contacted at

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, its that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.