Mr. Hartwright

Nick Hartwright

Co-Founder

Mill and Company Project

Nick Hartwright is one of London's leading social entrepreneurs. He is a huge supporter of the arts and culture-based projects, and wants to make them accessible to all. In the first instance he is a place-maker and has been, and is, involved in a number of exciting regeneration projects in the capital that are ultimately making people's lives, and communities, better.

His projects are about regeneration not gentrification, and all of Mr. Hartwright's spaces are sustainable, deliverable and affordable. He takes on derelict buildings, places that might be crumbling, and works with local authorities to restore them, give them a new lease of life and make them focal points in local and creative communities. Mr. Hartwright's is committed to making London's art scene flourish, and is incredibly supportive of creative minds. To this end, he recently opened Green Rooms, the UK’s first arts-led independent social enterprise hotel. Situated on Station Road in Wood Green, it is already changing the shape and face of the area.

Mr. Hartwirght is co-founder of The Mill Co. Project, a social enterprise that provides work and project spaces at extremely competitive rates for artists and small creative companies. Tenants are provided with a space to work in, performance areas and stages to put on shows or exhibitions by night, a network of other artists to collaborate with, a creative agency they can work with, and a store where they can sell their products. Under Nick's stewardship the The Mill Co. Project has grown incredibly quickly. Starting in 2010, it now operates nearly 100,000 square foot of workspace, theatre space, cafes, bars and restaurants across London, and supports over 100 SMEs.

Mr. Hartwright can be contacted at

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Group Meetings: Blue Skies Ahead
After a decade of sacrifice and struggle, it seems that hotels and meeting planners have every reason to be optimistic about the group meeting business going forward. By every industry benchmark and measure, 2017 is shaping up to be a record year, which means more meetings in more locations for more attendees. And though no one in the industry is complaining about this rosy outlook, the strong demand is increasing competition among meeting planners across the board – for the most desirable locations, for the best hotels, for the most creative experiences, for the most talented chefs, and for the best technology available. Because of this robust demand, hotels are in the driver’s seat and they are flexing their collective muscles. Even though over 100,000 new rooms were added last year, hotel rates are expected to rise by a minimum of 4.0%, and they are also charging fees on amenities that were often gratis in the past. In addition, hotels are offering shorter lead times on booking commitments, forcing planners to sign contracts earlier than in past years. Planners are having to work more quickly and to commit farther in advance to secure key properties. Planners are also having to meet increased attendee expectations. They no longer are content with a trade show and a few dinners; they want an experience. Planners need to find ways to create a meaningful experience to ensure that attendees walk away with an impactful memory. This kind of experiential learning can generate a deeper emotional connection, which can ultimately result in increased brand recognition, client retention, and incremental sales. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group business and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.