Mr. Hartwright

Nick Hartwright

Co-Founder

Mill and Company Project

Nick Hartwright is one of London's leading social entrepreneurs. He is a huge supporter of the arts and culture-based projects, and wants to make them accessible to all. In the first instance he is a place-maker and has been, and is, involved in a number of exciting regeneration projects in the capital that are ultimately making people's lives, and communities, better.

His projects are about regeneration not gentrification, and all of Mr. Hartwright's spaces are sustainable, deliverable and affordable. He takes on derelict buildings, places that might be crumbling, and works with local authorities to restore them, give them a new lease of life and make them focal points in local and creative communities. Mr. Hartwright's is committed to making London's art scene flourish, and is incredibly supportive of creative minds. To this end, he recently opened Green Rooms, the UKís first arts-led independent social enterprise hotel. Situated on Station Road in Wood Green, it is already changing the shape and face of the area.

Mr. Hartwirght is co-founder of The Mill Co. Project, a social enterprise that provides work and project spaces at extremely competitive rates for artists and small creative companies. Tenants are provided with a space to work in, performance areas and stages to put on shows or exhibitions by night, a network of other artists to collaborate with, a creative agency they can work with, and a store where they can sell their products. Under Nick's stewardship the The Mill Co. Project has grown incredibly quickly. Starting in 2010, it now operates nearly 100,000 square foot of workspace, theatre space, cafes, bars and restaurants across London, and supports over 100 SMEs.

Mr. Hartwright can be contacted at

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.