Mr. MacDougall

Jesse MacDougall

Creative Director of Strategy and Brand Development

ICRAVE

As the Creative Director of Strategy and Brand Development at innovation and design studio ICRAVE, Jesse MacDougall has provided creative vision and leadership for projects of all shapes and sizes including building up boutique brands like The Little Beet in New York. He has created roll-out brands for public companies like Hilton and STK. He has also been the driving force behind comprehensive hotel projects like the Sir A’DAM hotel in Amsterdam opening in 2016. Mr. MacDougall has also been responsible for reinventing cancer care delivery for Memorial Sloane Kettering’s new patient facilities in NYC.

Recently, Mr. MacDougall has been working to master plan new neighborhood developments in Miami and Washington, D.C. His team is also working with one of the world’s leading food management companies to identify shifts in higher education and reimagine college campuses for the class of 2030.

Previously he was Senior Design at Puccini Group where he led the branding and design of notable hospitality projects. Some of these include the renovation of The Georgian Terrace a historic hotel, restaurant, and residential tower in Midtown Atlanta. Prior to Puccini, he managed store planning and design at global luxury jewelry brand David Yurman. At David Yurman he managed the design and execution of over 100 in-store boutiques, 10 flagship stores, and a handful of multi-million dollar exhibition projects around the world. An expert in strategy, hospitality and experience design, Mr. MacDougall has been interviewed by Wallpaper* and Sleeper Magazine, and has spoken on many Hotel Business and Hospitality Design panels.

Please visit http://www.icrave.com for more information.

Mr. MacDougall can be contacted at 212-929-5657 or jesse@icrave.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.