Mr. Morvant, Jr.

Irby Morvant, Jr.

General Manager

Hyatt Regency San Francisco Airport

Irby Morvant Jr. is the general manager at Hyatt Regency San Francisco Airport. A seasoned professional with nearly 30 yearsí experience in the hospitality industry, Mr. Morvantís knowledge and passion for hospitality is invaluable as he leads the hotel through a complete, top-to-bottom renovation planned for completion in summer 2016.

Mr. Morvant boasts a 27-year tenure with Hyatt, serving in various sales and leadership roles at properties from coast-to-coast, including multiple Hyatts in Chicago, historic Hyatt Regency Cleveland at the Arcade, Hyatt Regency Boston and Hyatt Regency New Orleans. In 2007, Mr. Morvant was appointed regional vice president of sales based in Chicago, then moved into the role of general manager at Hyatt Regency Mission Bay Spa and Marina in San Diego prior to joining the team at Hyatt Regency San Francisco Airport.

Mr. Morvantís passion for ensuring the quality of every touchpoint in the hotel inspires his entire team to contribute their talents to create a tranquil and holistic experience for every guest. He has a special enthusiasm for creating the type of restorative experience that surpasses guestís expectations of an airport hotel.

A community man at heart, Mr. Morvant also serves on the boards of the Burlingame Chamber of Commerce and the San Mateo/Silicon Valley County Convention and Visitors Bureau. He graduated from University of New Orleans before being accepted into Hyattís Corporate Management Training program. In his free time, Mr. Morvant enjoys exploring the South Bay peninsula with his wife and three children, trying various types of cuisine and doing adventurous outdoor activities.

Please visit http://www.hyatt.com for more information.

Mr. Morvant, Jr. can be contacted at 650-347-1234 or irby.morvant@hyatt.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.