Ms. Harkness

Sarah Harkness

Marketing Manager

Screen Pilot

Sarah Harkness is the Marketing Manager for Screen Pilot, a Denver-based hospitality marketing agency that specializes in telling the stories of hotels and resorts using data science, creativity and strategic market place insights. Originally hailing from Austin - which explains her love of queso, lakes, and live music – Ms. Harkness attended college at Wake Forest University in North Carolina where she studied Media Communications but never found Tex-mex that was ever quite the same.

She began her career as a PR & Marketing Intern for the Head Office of Harvey Nichols in London where she worked with publications including Grazia, Tatler, The Times on Sunday, The Daily Mail, and more. For the last 8 years she has lived in Denver where she has consulted for clients in luxury, fashion, and hospitality. She regularly contributes as an author on Hospitality Net, Hotel Marketing, and eHotelier exploring topics related to marketing, trends, technology and data in the travel and hospitality industry.

Her passion for travel extends beyond the professional realm and she has visited over 21% of the world’s countries and is hoping to make that 100% someday. So far her favorite place to visit was Barcelona because she got to speak Spanish with a lisp, see Gaudi’s artwork in person, and eat churros whenever she pleased.

In her spare time you can find her lost somewhere in the great outdoors with her husband and their corgi mix Bateman, wandering around art museums, enjoying a cocktail on a patio, or scuba diving in the deep blue sea. She is the Founder of the Denver Agency Meetup and a member of The Denver Junior League.

Please visit http://www.screenpilot.com for more information.

Ms. Harkness can be contacted at 720-336-0610 or sharkness@screenpilot.com

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key
The challenge for hotel food and beverage operations is to serve the personal tastes and needs of an increasingly diverse population and, at the same time, to keep up with ever-evolving industry trends. In order to accomplish this, restaurateurs and hoteliers have to flex their creative muscles and pull out all the stops to satisfy their various audiences. One way to achieve this is to utilize existing food spaces in multiple ways at different times of the day. Lunch can be casual and fast, while dinnertime can be more formal and slower paced. The same restaurant can offer counter service by day but provide table service by night, with a completely different menu and atmosphere. Changes in music, lighting, uniforms and tabletop design contribute to its transformation. This multi- purpose approach seeks to meet the dining needs of guests as they change throughout the day. Today’s restaurants also have to go to great lengths to fulfill all the diverse dietary preferences of their guests. The popularity of plant-based, paleo, vegan, and gluten and allergen-free diets means that traditional menus must evolve from protein-heavy, carb-loaded offerings to those featuring more vegetables and legumes. Chefs are doing creative things with vegetables, such as experimenting with global cuisines or incorporating new vegetable hybrids into their dishes. Another trend is an emphasis on bold and creative flavors. From chili oil to sriracha to spicy maple syrup, entrees, desserts and beverages are all being enhanced with spice and heat. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.