Ms. Harkness

Sarah Harkness

Marketing Manager

Screen Pilot

Sarah Harkness is the Marketing Manager for Screen Pilot, a Denver-based hospitality marketing agency that specializes in telling the stories of hotels and resorts using data science, creativity and strategic market place insights. Originally hailing from Austin - which explains her love of queso, lakes, and live music – Ms. Harkness attended college at Wake Forest University in North Carolina where she studied Media Communications but never found Tex-mex that was ever quite the same.

She began her career as a PR & Marketing Intern for the Head Office of Harvey Nichols in London where she worked with publications including Grazia, Tatler, The Times on Sunday, The Daily Mail, and more. For the last 8 years she has lived in Denver where she has consulted for clients in luxury, fashion, and hospitality. She regularly contributes as an author on Hospitality Net, Hotel Marketing, and eHotelier exploring topics related to marketing, trends, technology and data in the travel and hospitality industry.

Her passion for travel extends beyond the professional realm and she has visited over 21% of the world’s countries and is hoping to make that 100% someday. So far her favorite place to visit was Barcelona because she got to speak Spanish with a lisp, see Gaudi’s artwork in person, and eat churros whenever she pleased.

In her spare time you can find her lost somewhere in the great outdoors with her husband and their corgi mix Bateman, wandering around art museums, enjoying a cocktail on a patio, or scuba diving in the deep blue sea. She is the Founder of the Denver Agency Meetup and a member of The Denver Junior League.

Please visit http://www.screenpilot.com for more information.

Ms. Harkness can be contacted at 720-336-0610 or sharkness@screenpilot.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.