Ms. Brett

Beth Brett

Co-founder and Principal

Blink Creative Group

Beth Brett and her business partner, Emma Haber, are the co-founders and principals of Blink Creative Group, a full-service communications enterprise with a focus on hospitality and lifestyle brands. As strategic storytellers—who can implement all facets of communications from branding and PR to partnerships and events as well as creative writing and social media support—clients seek out their firm for thoughtful and thought-provoking brand experiences. As industry veterans—each with more than 15 years of extensive media and marketing expertise working with world-renowned brands—their agency offers authentic and unparalleled communications solutions.

Before founding Blink Creative Group with Ms. Haber, Mrs. Brett served as the communications director for the Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board. For eight years, Mrs. Brett was a lead publicist for The Getty, where she forged strategic partnerships and managed PR for every major program at the world-renowned arts institution. Prior to her Getty post, she was a communications specialist for Hospital Special Surgery, one of the nation’s top hospitals. After graduating from Princeton University, Mrs. Brett began her career in New York at SERINO/COYNE, where she worked on creative campaigns for live entertainment brands. With a master’s degree from Stanford’s Journalism School, Mrs. Brett has also written feature stories for The New York Times, Newsday, The San Francisco Chronicle and ESPN the Magazine.

Please visit www.blinkcreativegroup.com for more information.

Ms. Brett can be contacted at 310-850-2701 or beth@blinkcreativegroup.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.