Ms. Holowka

Taryn Holowka

Senior Vice President of Marketing, Communications & Advocacy

U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)

A skilled communicator, storyteller and multi-market brand strategist, Taryn Holowka brings 16 years of experience in building multinational brands. Currently the Senior Vice President of Marketing, Communications & Advocacy at the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), Ms. Holowka heads up all global marketing, communications and public affairs efforts for USGBC and its popular LEED green building program. She is also responsible for a variety of other B2B sustainability brands at the Green Business Certification, Inc. (GBCI), including PEER, WELL, SITES and EDGE.

Ms. Holowka is responsible for the successful development, implementation and measurement of product and mission-marketing initiatives both in the U.S. and internationally while managing a dynamic staff of 30+, covering all market sectors of USGBC’s broad membership and aligned organizations.

Ms. Holowka's core areas of expertise are strategic communications planning, messaging and product and brand management; project and people management; business development and analytics; emerging technologies; and leadership. Ms. Holowka was also awarded PR News’ PR Person of the Year in 2008 and nominated for Marketing Executive of the Year in 2014.

Ms. Holowka holds a Masters in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University and a B.A. in Political Science from the State University of New York College at Geneseo. She has been a LEED AP since 2004. Prior to joining USGBC, Ms. Holowka worked at the National Environmental Policy Institute (NEPI) overseeing an EPA grant as part of the Clean Air Act. She also was at the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA).

Please visit http://usgbc.org for more information.

Ms. Holowka can be contacted at 202.828.1144 or tholowka@usgbc.org

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.